Waste Incineration is not a Solution; it’s Pollution. We refuse to burn waste.

September 8, 2023 –  West Java Governor Ridwan Kamil on Wednesday (9/8/2023) has announced the name of the winner of the tender that will build and manage the Legok Nangka Waste Processing and Final Processing Site/ Tempat Pengolahan dan Pemrosesan Akhir Sampah (TPPAS) in Citaman Village, Nagreg District, Bandung Regency. Therefore, there will be a Waste-to-Energy facility or incinerator for the Waste Power Plant at that location. The TPPAS Legok Nangka will burn waste sent from six regions, namely Bandung City, Cimahi City, Bandung Regency, West Bandung Regency, Garut Regency, and Sumedang Regency.

Not long after the announcement, the Sarimukti Landfill experienced a fire incident for more than 7 days and led to the announcement of the waste emergency status by Ridwan Kamil. In response to these two incidents, AZWI, WALHI West Java, WALHI National, Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA), called for a halt to the use of thermal technologies such as incinerators. The West Java Provincial Government and the West Java Environment Agency need to review the decision to choose this waste burning technology in the midst of a waste emergency.

Meiki Paendong, Executive Director of WALHI West Java stated, “The high cost of incinerator tipping fees and the put-or-pay mechanism in the cooperation contract is an imposition that is very risky and burdens public funds owned by district and city governments. The Sarimukti landfill fire is one indication that the current budget is far from sufficient to operate a safe landfill.”

Meiki emphasized that incinerators are the most expensive way to handle waste and generate electricity. According to him, cities and regencies still need a huge additional budget to manage waste in a segregated manner and reduce waste at source, especially organic waste which dominates Metro Bandung’s waste generation.

He also added that funding for incinerators should be diverted to manage organic waste which is the culprit of the Sarimukti landfill fire and Leuwigajah landfill explosion. “Investing in composting has the potential to generate at least 6 times more new jobs than incinerators,” added Meiki.

Abdul Ghofar from WALHI’s National Executive said, “The Legok Nangka Waste Power Plant project is burdening and harming the country’s finances with a 100 million dollar debt loan from the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), part of the World Bank. Ghofar also criticized the winning of the Legok Nangka Waste Power Plant tender to a Japanese consortium company. “The determination of incinerator technology was allegedly influenced by the results of technical assistance by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) which led to the winning of the Sumitomo – Hitachi Zosen consortium, a Japanese company selling incinerators in various countries. The huge tipping fee will benefit the Japanese but harm the people who pay through taxes,” continued the urban issues campaigner.

In addition, the International Waste Pickers Alliance also reported that incinerators and privatization of the waste sector are very detrimental to waste pickers and informal workers in the waste sector.  

Another deal that is detrimental to local governments is related to subsidies. This will lead to a reduction in the budget available for sorting, recycling and generation limitation efforts which are the targets of Local Policy and Strategy on Municipal Solid Waste or also known as JAKSTRADA.

GAIA’s response: Waste and the climate crisis

Meanwhile, Yobel Novian Putra from the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) emphasized the negative consequences of incinerators on the climate crisis. “Incinerators

will only replicate the Sarimukti landfill fire that released greenhouse gasses on a large scale. Like the landfill fire, incinerators burn a mixture of different types of waste, both organic waste and plastics made from fossil fuels.” Recent studies have shown that incinerators in the US, UK and Europe release more greenhouse gas emissions than coal-fired power plants. “Burning organic waste only converts methane gas emissions from organic waste into massive CO2. This will only keep Indonesia away from the Paris Agreement target and the Global Methane Pledge agreement that Indonesia signed recently,” criticized Yobel who is a Climate Policy Officer from GAIA.

Responding to the greater Bandung area waste crisis related to the Sarimukti landfill fire, Meiki emphasized, “Burning waste, especially wet organic waste, is very inefficient and only converts one problem into another. On the other hand, technologies such as composting and bio-conversion (e.g. Black Soldier Fly) or maggot can prevent methane gas emissions at a unit cost that is much cheaper, easier, and has multiple benefits.”  He also added that when the Sarimukti landfill could not be used, the Legok Nangka Final Processing Site should have been used to overcome the waste crisis. But because the facility is bound by the Public-Private Partnership (PPP) scheme, it cannot even be opened.

Therefore, we, civil society organizations, are of the view that the incinerator is not a solution to the waste problem and will only cause new social and environmental problems. Not only that, it is possible that it will burden the finances of local and city governments.  

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Media Contacts: 

Siti Dzakiyyah, Media Relations Officer. Aliansi Zero Waste Indonesia  | kia@aliansizerowaste.id | +62 852-1580-9537

Meiki Paendong, Executive Director, WALHI West Java | meikipaendong@walhijabar.id | +62 857-2145-2117

Yobel Novian Putra, Climate Policy Officer, GAIA | yobel@no-burn.org | +62 821-2818-4440

About Alliance Zero Waste Indonesia (AZWI) | The Zero Waste Indonesia Alliance is an association of organizations consisting of YPBB, GIDKP, Nexus3 Foundation, PPLH Bali, ECOTON, ICEL, Nol Sampah Surabaya, Greenpeace Indonesia, Gita Pertiwi and WALHI. AZWI campaigns for the correct implementation of the Zero Waste concept within a mainstreaming framework through various Zero Waste activities, programs, and initiatives that already exist to be implemented in various cities and regencies in Indonesia by considering the waste management hierarchy, material life cycle, and sustainable production and consumption approaches. 

About WALHI West Java | Wahana Lingkungan Hidup Indonesia (WALHI) is an independent and non-profile environmental organization established on October 15, 1980. WALHI has more than 500 member organizations and 28 regional offices, one of which is WALHI West Java. WALHI is affiliated with the Friends of the Earth International Federation. An international grassroots organization in 76 countries. 

About GAIA (Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives) | GAIA is a network of grassroots groups and national and regional alliances representing more than 1000 organizations from 92 countries. GAIA focuses on waste and environmental justice issues and works to strengthen grassroots social movements that advance solutions to waste and pollution. 

Sources/References:

https://bandung.bisnis.com/read/20230827/549/1688688/ridwan-kamil-rilis-aturan-bandung-raya-darurat-sampah

Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (2021). The High Cost of Waste Incineration. https://www.no-burn.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/The-High-Cost-of-Waste-Incineration-March-30.pdf

Ribeiro-Broomhead, J. & Tangri, N. (2021). Zero Waste and Economic Recovery: The Job Creation Potential of Zero Waste Solutions. Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives. https://www.no-burn.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Jobs-Report-ENGLISH-1.pdf

https://www.worldbank.org/en/news/loans-credits/2019/12/05/indonesia-improvement-of-solid-waste-management-to-support-regional-and-metropolitan-cities

https://www.worldbank.org/en/news/loans-credits/2019/12/05/indonesia-improvement-of-solid-waste-management-to-support-regional-and-metropolitan-cities https://www.worldbank.org/en/news/loans-credits/2019/12/05/indonesia-improvement-of-solid-waste-management-to-support-regional-and-metropolitan-cities

Interview with Mahesh Nakarmi by Dan Abril

Mahesh Nakarmi, professionally a Disaster Risk Management Specialist, with a qualification of Masters degree in Civil Engineering  underwent a transformative experience that led him to embrace Zero Waste. While as a co-founder of the National Kidney Center, he personally encountered the improper disposal of hazardous waste, posing significant risks to communities and waste workers. Witnessing this first hand, he felt an urgent need to take action and promote improved methods for health care waste management which was neglected during those days.

He co-founded Health Care Foundation Nepal (HECAF) in 1994 to address this and ultimately, Mahesh’s efforts in advocating for proper health care waste management prevailed. In 1999, through his efforts, the NKC became the first hospital in Nepal to disinfect the waste generated during care of the kidney patients by using autoclave as a non burn technology. So when he developed a complete health care waste management system at the center, it ultimately  resulted in the reduced quantity of waste  being sent to the landfill. His path took another turn upon meeting GAIA Asia Pacific and Health Care Without Harm. Through these organizations, Mahesh learned about non-burn and no harm approaches including Zero Waste principles and realized that what he was doing is already  Zero Waste. 

In 2020, HECAF became the Health Environment and Climate Action Foundation (HECAF360) and today has a team of 20 people coming from diverse backgrounds such as engineering, environmental science, environmental engineering, biomedical engineering, nursing, public health, and healthcare. 

We had the opportunity to chat with Mahesh and we discussed HECAF360’s journey in becoming a Zero Waste pioneer in Nepal. 

The HECAF360 Team. (Photo courtesy of HECAF360)

What are HECAF 360’s top priorities?

We work on a lot of areas and we address the gaps. These include Zero Waste, healthcare waste, hygiene, and climate resilience. It’s all interrelated. When we talk about menstrual hygiene management, we talk about women’s health and also talk about waste management. But mainly it’s all about Zero Waste and advocating for zero toxins and zero burn approaches to waste management. 

We understand that waste management is a long-term process that cannot be resolved within a short period but by adopting a Zero Waste approach we will achieve our ultimate goal of not having to send any waste to landfills. To realize our objectives, we are trying to define the role of individual citizens in the management of the waste that they generate daily, so we are exploring smart waste management solutions. Through this, we ensure that different types of waste are appropriately handled: recycling is directed to designated recycling centers, landfill waste is appropriately disposed of in landfills, and food waste is routed to food processing facilities to be converted into compost. 

An essential aspect of this system is it provides employment opportunities to waste pickers and integrates them into the waste management process.

Photo courtesy of HECAF360

What are HECAF360’s ongoing campaigns?

We have campaigns on plastic waste and water-related campaigns but everything leads to Zero Waste. You simply cannot advocate for Zero Waste without taking these issues into account. When we conduct our education campaigns in hospitals and government offices, we talk about Zero Waste and we talk at all levels from kindergarten and up, as well as from municipality to federal ministries.

What are HECAF360’s biggest accomplishments/achievements?

We have a lot of stories to share! We’re proud to have introduced Zero Waste not only in hospitals but to the rest of Nepal. We are continuously creating Zero Waste coalitions. We do not only collaborate with hospitals but through coalitions, we also bring together schools, businesses, INGOs, the government, and those working on recycling and upcycling. 

Photo courtesy of HECAF360

What challenges are you currently facing and how is the organization impacted by the COVID crisis?

In 2020, we only had a staff of about 6 to 8 people. At that time, Nepal had not yet experienced the impact of COVID-19. Then, the Minister of Health reached out to us for assistance during the evacuation of 175 students studying in Wuhan, where the pandemic began.

We responded to the call and we took on the challenge and designed a comprehensive waste management system in collaboration with the army, police, the civil aviation authority, and airlines. Our efforts extended from managing waste at airports and handling quarantine centers. 

In this endeavor, we partnered with the Tzu Chi Foundation in Taiwan to facilitate the donations, which involved 10 charter flights. However, there are several challenges in the process. To provide support for waste management in hospitals and donate essential items like ventilators, oxygen concentrators, High Flow Nasal Cannula, and personal protective equipment (PPEs), we were required to have special permission from the government. Though it was a significant challenge, we persevered, and worked closely with authorities and handed over all these items to the Ministry of Health and Population.

With the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Population and with the support of the World Health Organisation (WHO) in Nepal, GiZ Nepal, and the Swiss Government; the HECAF360 team worked at the government health facilities around the clock to improve waste management systems.  Working around these challenges not only strengthened our resolve but also made life more interesting. Despite the risks brought by the pandemic, our staff felt a sense of fulfillment in being able to contribute to the community by providing food relief for needy people in different communities. It provided an opportunity to learn and collaborate with our waste pickers. We were successful in providing a little support to the waste pickers.

Overall, the experience of managing waste during the COVID-19 crisis offered unique learning experiences as we worked closely with both government offices and local communities.

Photo courtesy of HECAF360

What are the main environmental issues your country or region is facing?

The current waste management situation is connected with various environmental issues, including landfills, air pollution, and river pollution, these are related to the broader problem in waste management. Our specific concern now are the chemicals leaching out of Nepal’s landfills, this has worsened the waste management issue. This has directly impacted the public health of the people residing in surrounding communities near the landfill sites. So we need to find a better solution to minimize the quantity of waste to be disposed of at the landfill by integrating waste into a circular economy through the Zero Waste Cities program. And we are actively collaborating with the local, provincial, and federal governments in search of solutions.

How do you see your HECAF360’s work evolving in the next years? 

We have identified numerous areas to focus on, and we still have many plans in progress, including improving the way we communicate our work. Our goal is to be more proactive in implementing Zero Waste systems throughout the country.

Recently, the Ministry of Health began discouraging the use of incinerators in hospitals and encouraged the use of non-burn technologies. This indicates a growing awareness and commitment to the Zero Waste approach. As such, in the coming years, we look forward to Nepal becoming more Zero Waste.

Do you collaborate with partners in other regions? If so, how?

We establish partnerships wherever we go. We want to learn from partners and they want to learn from us. One example is when we went to Penang in Malaysia. At the Tzu Chi Dialysis Center in Penang,  Tzu Chi Foundation Volunteers run a waste recycling program  and the income from this program supports the operation of center and their outreach to communities in need. 

How does your work on waste relate to social justice?

We call on our right to health and a clean environment and we are also advocating for a just transition for waste pickers. Despite the challenges, we continue to push for the government to act. 

Who do you admire most in the environmental work (in your country or in the world)?

There is a lot of good environmental work being done in other countries. I have a lot of admiration for environmental groups in the Philippines for succeeding in banning incineration. There is also a lot of work being done in reclaiming rivers and bringing them to life again. That is commendable. 

HECAF360 always believes in action. That’s why we have action in our name. We don’t do a lot of writing or publishing. We don’t post a lot on social media but we have action. We have zeal for what we want to do and we will continue to do so until we bring the smile back. 

Call for funding: 

Currently, HECAF360 lacks the necessary resources to fund their policy work. Support HECAF360 and their goal of achieving a Zero Waste Nepal, email HECAF360 at management@hecaf360.org or visit their website at https://www.hecaf.info/

En un momento donde la crisis climática y la contaminación por plástico son asuntos que hay que atender con urgencia, es crucial encontrar soluciones reales y locales para abordar estos desafíos ambientales que enfrentamos. En ese sentido, los miembros de GAIA, están a punto de celebrar su encuentro regional en Lima, Perú, desde el viernes 30 de junio al domingo 2 de julio. El encuentro contará con más de 30 representantes de organizaciones y alianzas de toda América Latina y el Caribe, y se reunirán para discutir y trabajar en temas clave relacionados con cómo enfrentar las falsas soluciones y promover iniciativas basura cero en la región. 

Durante el encuentro, los participantes tendrán la oportunidad de profundizar en las líneas de trabajo de GAIA, centrándose en estrategias de basura cero y en economía circular. Además, se tratarán temas relacionados a  políticas y prácticas que promuevan la reducción de residuos en origen, la separación adecuada de los materiales reciclables, el rol de las y los recicladores de base y la implementación de sistemas efectivos de reciclaje y compostaje.

Abordando los desafíos ambientales

El encuentro también se enfocará en temas críticos como el cambio climático, las emisiones de metano y la contaminación por plástico. Los miembros y aliados de GAIA explorarán formas de reducir las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero, especialmente el metano, que es un poderoso contribuyente al calentamiento global. Además, se discutirán estrategias para abordar la creciente crisis de contaminación por plástico, la participación de América Latina en el futuro tratado global de plásticos, y el fomento de iniciativas de reducción de plásticos de un solo uso.

No a la incineración y a las falsas soluciones

GAIA y sus miembros han sido defensores incansables de la oposición a la incineración de residuos y de desafiar las llamadas “falsas soluciones” que no hacen más que perpetúan los problemas ambientales y sociales relacionados a la gestión de residuos. Durante el encuentro regional, se destacará la importancia de no dar lugar a que las falsas soluciones tengan cabida en la región.

Seminario internacional 

En el marco de la reunión regional de GAIA, el lunes de 3 de julio llevará a cabo el seminario “Disminuyendo emisiones en el sector de residuos municipales, a partir de la estrategia basura cero”, que contará con dos paneles. El primero se centrará en el lanzamiento de la publicación de Ciudad Saludable “El Milagro: censo socioeconómico de recicladores”, que aborda el cierre de un botadero y la transición justa para los recicladores de base. Mientras que en el segundo bloque se va a discutir sobre formas de evitar las emisiones de metano de nuestros residuos.

Organizaciones y aliados que participarán en el encuentro:
  • Argentina:Taller Ecologista, Bios Argentina,  Coalición Anti incineración, Centro de Estudios sobre Tecnologías Apropiadas de la Argentina (CETAR), y Red de Acción en Plaguicidas y sus Alternativas de América Latina, RAP-AL.
  • Brasil: Instituo Polis, ARZ Brasil
  • Chile: RADA, Alianza Basura Cero Chile, Viento Sur, Fundación Lenga, Fundación Basura, ANARCH. 
  • Colombia:Recicladores Bogotá.
  • Costa Rica: Costa Rica Hacia Basura Cero, MarViva, Universidad de Costa Rica. 
  • Ecuador: Mingas por el Mar, Alianza Basura Cero Ecuador. 
  • El Salvador: CESTA.
  • Guatemala: CEIBA.
  • Haití: Haiti Survive.
  • México: Fronteras Comunes, Colectiva Malditos Plásticos, NEB,  CEJ, Colectivo Ecologista de Jalisco, Plastic Solution, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Asociación Ecológica Santo Tomás.
  • Nicaragua: Jóvenes Ambientalistas.
  • Perú: Ciudad Saludable.
  • Uruguay: RAPAL.

Interview with  Chong Tek Lee and Lam Choong  Wah by Dan Abril

Established in 2014, Gabungan Anti-Insinerator Kebangsaan (GAIK) is the result of different organizations uniting to oppose the construction of waste-to-energy (WtE) incinerators across Malaysia. 

These four organizations: Selamatkan Bukit Payong, Gabungan Anti Insinerator Cameron Highlands, Jawatankuasa Anti Insinerator Tanah Merah, and Jawatankuasa Bertindak Kuala Lumpur Tak Nak Insinerator (KTI) joined hands determined to convince the Malaysian Government to put an immediate halt to the development of WtE facilities and to instead adopt a more effective and sustainable waste management strategy: Zero Waste.

At the time it was founded, GAIK faced three mega-incinerators. The group managed to succeed  in halting the construction of one  of these incinerators. However, the Malaysian government hasn’t stopped pushing for WtE incineration and has plans to construct at least one mega- incinerator per state. Today, GAIK is an alliance of 10 individuals and 5 non-government organizations (NGOs) still united in their fight against incinerators. 

Photo courtesy of GAIK

We had the chance to sit down with GAIK Committee Member, Lam Choong Wah and one of GAIK’s founders, Chong Tek Lee and  during our discussion, we explored GAIK’s beginnings, their current actions, the difficulties they face,  and their goals and visions for the future. 

What are GAIK’s main campaigns?

We are primarily focused on anti-incineration campaigns and Zero Waste. 

We are still a small organization and there’s only one partner organization,  which is also a GAIA member, Zero Waste Malaysia, that works on Zero Waste so we’re also working on getting more non-government organizations (NGOs) and concerned individuals to get involved.

Since WtE incinerator proposals mostly happen in densely populated areas, we approach residents and help them mobilize against these “monsters”. For the Malaysian government, burning waste is the fastest solution to waste and people should oppose it – as much as we can. 

What are GAIK’s biggest achievements and accomplishments?

We successfully lobbied against the construction of a WtE incinerator in one state. In Kepong, Kuala Lumpur, after a series of protests, we managed to convince the authorities to not move forward with the project and  then in Johor, the authorities are still carrying on with but we lodged a report at the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC) and urged the commission to probe the Urban Wellbeing, Housing and Local Government over their awarding of contracts for incinerator projects. Then in 2019, We also organized a large forum focused on Zero Waste and anti-incineration and planned to have more similar events after. 

What challenges are you facing and how was your work impacted by the COVID crisis?

Since we are a very small organization, our resources are very limited. It can also be difficult to locate WtE proposals in the country. Currently, there are at least 13 WtE proposals – one for each region. When one proposal is rejected by residents, the government only moves to another location. 

Right now there is one being proposed in Selangor State and is planned to accept garbage from neighboring regions. 

It is not always easy to go against these proposals. People are not always ready to fight these “monsters”. People can be scared as authorities take the identification numbers of residents. 

The pandemic made it more difficult for us, all our activities were put on hold and so our targets were not met. It is only now – after three years – that we have become fully active again.

Photo courtesy of GAIK

What are the main environmental issues that your country/region is facing? 

We have a significant problem with single-use plastics (SUPs). We try not to use SUPs such as straws or plastic bags but some tourists and non-Malaysians still need to be aware about the immensity of plastic pollution. Yes, SUPs are used everywhere but you have to lose things to gain better things. There will be a ban on SUPs by 2025 but it needs to be developed further and we need to work with the government on that.  

Another issue is that the waste trade is still happening. We often receive news from WhatsApp groups but these are not widely publicized. China, a developing country, was able to ban it. Malaysia is also a developing country and we should also put a stop to this practice because we pay a lot more in terms of environmental damage. A lot of these waste exports end up in landfills. Some activists are trying to put a stop to it but owners of facilities accepting waste exports can have so much power and be able to prevent people from even entering their area. 

How do you see your organization’s work evolving in the next few years?

We need to increase the number of people and organizations joining us. There are a lot of people practicing Zero Waste but they are not organized. Currently, GAIA members The Center to Combat Corruption and Cronyism (C4), Zero Waste Malaysia, and the Consumers Association of Penang (CAP)  are potential GAIK  members. We need to be united to be strong since  it is not easy to go against authorities. That is the solution that we would like to achieve: for GAIK to be a show of force. 

We are praying that the Malaysian government will listen to the people and work with them. You cannot go far if your government does not cooperate. 

What are your thoughts on the waste crisis that many countries in your region (and in the world) are living in right now? 

What goes on in another country affects us. Like in Singapore, they burn waste and the smoke from their incinerator goes to Malaysia. Unfortunately, there are no organizations in Singapore to oppose incinerators – the government is too harsh. 

In some countries, people are too poor and are too worried about their bread and butter that they cannot think about environmental issues. We are hoping that soon, we can all work together as a region and address our persistent environmental issues. 

Photo courtesy of GAIK

Do you collaborate with partners in other regions? If so, how?

We work with organizations such as GAIA. We joined GAIA’s Regional Meeting in Vietnam last April.  We met up with a lot of GAIA members and saw we can build a coalition with other Southeast Asian countries to launch Zero Waste or anti-incineration campaigns. We believe that there is power in numbers and alliances such as GAIA are important. If you want to learn, you need to learn hand-in-hand with other people. 

How does your work on waste relate to social justice? 

This is really hard for me to answer but then also remember that rubbish is collected and transported to other areas. This is not healthy for receiving communities and so are the working conditions for those involved. Change cannot happen overnight and we think we are helping with our Zero Waste strategies. 

Who do you admire most in environmental work (in your country or in the world)?

We admire Greenpeace Malaysia. They work really hard! Mr. Heng Kiah Chun of Greenpeace is particularly admirable. If something comes up, it takes only one message to our group and all NGOs are quick to respond. 

To know more about GAIK and their campaigns, you can visit the We Anti Kepong Incinerator on Facebook. The group is actively engaged in campaigns and initiatives to oppose the construction of the incinerator and raise awareness about its potential environmental and health impacts.

Australia quietly reopens plastic waste exports while, UNEP “Turns on the Tap” for burning plastic waste in cement kilns: Policy desperation on the eve of Plastic Treaty negotiations

20 May 2023 – On the eve of the new global Plastics Treaty negotiations in Paris, the Australian Environment Minister has decided to reopen plastic waste exports, after a five-year ban introduced by the previous federal government. The 2019 ban on waste exports came in response to China and Southeast Asian countries expose` on waste dumping. Countries that Australia had previously exported plastic waste to, such as Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia and the Philippines, struggle to manage plastic waste pollution, resulting in significant harm to vulnerable communities and sensitive marine environments.

As scientific evidence grows on the full extent and damage to our planet and human health that plastic waste causes, such regressive decisions from Australia underscore a colonialist approach to waste management policy, where pollution is externalised.

The decision highlights decades of failed national plastic waste regulation and a national plastic waste policy in disarray. “This is no way to fight a plastic pollution crisis,” warns Jane Bremmer, Coordinator of Zero Waste Australia “We have already seen the waste export ban exploited by government and the waste industry. They colluded to create an exemption on exports of bales of mixed plastic waste and paper rebranded as Process Engineered Fuels’. Now we have an admission that plastic waste management is failing in Australia. This is not how you address a plastic waste crisis -we need a cap on plastic production that’s how you address the plastic waste crisis.”

At the same time the UN has released a report that recommends burning plastic waste in cement kilns, a technology that creates significant pollution that poses health threats to workers and neighbouring communities.

Bremmer said “This is one of the most polluting smokestack industries in the world and incredibly the UN is recommending they increase burning plastic waste. Cement kilns are listed as one of the worlds largest dioxin polluters and plastic wastes contain many toxic chemicals that will add to dioxin emissions. The waste industry is clearly having too much influence on these types of publications and Australian policy.”

Australia’s role and commitment to the UNEA High Ambition Coalition to End Plastic Pollution is questionable as it fails to demonstrate real action on the agreed Global Strategic Goals, choosing instead to export this hazardous waste and invest in false solutions, such as burning plastic waste in cement kilns and investing in controversial technologies such as chemical recycling. Australia has failed to act on reducing the consumption and production of plastic, instead allowing industry to promote recycling as a solution while simultaneously increasing the production of non-recyclable single use plastic. Australia has invested $250 million of public funds into waste recycling infrastructure to support an industry sector that cannot deliver the solutions we need. Indeed, they are invested in the continuing growth of plastic waste, in direct opposition to the international consensus for an urgent reduction in plastic production.

Yet the recent UNEP report released in preparation for the upcoming Plastic Treaty negotiations – “Turning off the Tap” appears to ignore its own key message instead promoting plastic recycling and burning in cement kilns as solutions, both of which will never “Turn off the Tap” for plastic production. It is clear that the fossil fuel and petrochemicals sector continues to dominate at the highest levels of international negotiations, in lock step with wealthy OECD nations such as Australia, by delaying real action on this urgent climate, ecological and human health threat, that is disproportionately impacting the most vulnerable countries and communities, globally.

“Australia must uphold its commitments to the High Ambition Coalition by immediately acting to stop all plastic waste exports and delivering on the agreed Global Strategic Goals. This is hazardous waste as defined in our Australian legislation and should not be exported anywhere. Quietly granting exemptions to waste management facilities to continue exporting this hazardous waste is a slap in the face to all Australians who thought our new federal government cared about the impacts of plastic pollution on our environment both in and outside Australia and the human rights of all peoples.”, states Zero Waste Australia, Campaign Coordinator, Jane Bremmer.

“We are very disappointed that Australia is reopening waste exports. Malaysia has experienced the impacts of dirty waste trade from Australia, including wastes that were disguised as “fuels”. Australia should prioritise source reduction and take responsibility for their own waste. Do not export harm in the pretext of recycling,” states Mageswari Sangaralingam, Consumers’ Association of Penang.

“At a time when Thailand is phasing out the imports of plastic scraps and intensifying its regulations on transboundary waste, it is disheartening to see a more developed country moving in the opposite direction. Not to mention, in July last year, 130 tons of municipal waste from Australia was found in a Thai port. To this day, it is unclear if this batch of waste has been repatriated. Plastic exports from Australia have long been a problem for Thailand, and the reopening of plastic waste export policy will only worsen the situation. We urge the Australian government to take responsibility for the waste and pollution its country creates, rather than seeking policies that could violate other’s environmental sovereignty and will draw nothing more than condemnation and embarrassment.” Punyathorn Jeungsmarn, Information and Communication Officer, EARTH.

“This policy is a step backward and should be reversed, ” said Aileen Lucero, National Coordinator, EcoWaste Coalition. “Instead of exporting its plastic wastes to the Philippines and elsewhere, Australia should put a cap on plastic production and consumption and ensure that unwanted plastics are not incinerated, co-processed in cement kilns or sent offshore in the guise of recycling.”

“Australia’s reversed policy is a bad example of plastic waste governance. Developed countries like Australia should set an example of how to keep a promise,” said Yuyun Ismawati from Nexus3 Foundation. “Exporting waste for ‘recycling’ or waste to energy to other countries is unsustainable. We’ve witnessed adverse impacts with Australian packaging brands dumped in the communities near paper and plastic recycling factories in Indonesia. In addition, Australian investments in Indonesia to address plastic pollution have made little progress. Australia should clean up its own backyard and increase investment in its own waste management systems instead of exporting and polluting neighbouring countries.”

Contacts:

Jane Bremmer

Zero Waste Australia

Campaign Coordinator

National Toxics Network

Australia

Aileen Lucero

EcoWaste Coalition 78-A Masigla Extension, Barangay Central,

1100 Quezon City, Philippines Phone: +632-82944807

Website: www.ecowastecoalition.org ,

http://ecowastecoalition.blogspot.com

Yuyun Ismawati Drwiega

Senior Advisor & co-founder of Nexus3

IPEN Lead for ASM/Mining

W: www.nexus3foundation.org

Mageswari Sangaralingam

Consumers’ Association of Penang & Friends of the Earth Malaysia

Website: www.consumer.org.my

Punyathorn Jeungsmarn
Information and Communication Officer
Ecological Alert and Recovery – Thailand (EARTH)

https://www.earththailand.org/en/
Daniela Concha, directora ejecutiva Fundación El Árbol. ⓒ ANR Colombia.

Por Daniela Concha, directora ejecutiva Fundación El Árbol, Chile.

“¡Reciclaje sin recicladores es basura!”, es la consigna que había escuchado muchas veces en Chile, pero al escucharlo de la voz de cientos de recicladores colombianos, se siente y se vuelve una, la lucha desde el sur global por el reconocimiento y la real integración de los recicladores de base. El motivo y la fecha del encuentro no fue casual; la Asociación Nacional de Recicladores de Colombia (ANR) planificó su minga congreso anual para que coincidiera con la primera conmemoración del Día Internacional Basura Cero, el 30 de marzo, precisamente cuando el gobierno comienza a trabajar en un programa basura cero para el país. La ANR planificó su jornada para, en primer lugar, repasar y reafirmar los derechos ganados a través de los fallos de la Corte Constitucional y consensuar nuevos derechos y demandas en relación a la retribución de su servicio, y en segundo lugar, informar y capacitar sobre Basura Cero a sus asociados. Fue en ese espacio, donde desde Fundación El Árbol y Alianza Basura Cero Brasil, pudimos compartir con los recicladores provenientes de todas las organizaciones del país, los principales conceptos, principios y pilares Basura Cero que compartimos las organizaciones miembro de GAIA, y su esencial vínculo con los recicladores. 

Desde mi experiencia en Concepción, Chile, donde trabajamos con recicladores y recicladoras hace ya 10 años, poder observar y escuchar a sus pares colombianos fue tremendamente inspirador y aleccionante de que con constancia en la lucha y de la mano de buenos aliados, es posible ir consiguiendo las garantías mínimas para un trabajo digno. Pese a eso, nuestra realidad en Chile tiene una gran diferencia: los colombianos pagan su tarifa de aseo tal como se paga el agua o la luz, y es desde ahí de donde se obtiene la “tarifa de aprovechamiento” de los recicladores (el porcentaje que les corresponde por la cantidad de kilos de residuos que recuperan para reciclaje). En nuestro país, el 80% de los ciudadanos están exentos del pago de derecho de aseo (1). Eso nos tiene expectantes al día de hoy, a la implementación de la ley 20.920, donde las empresas responsables de poner productos con residuos en el mercado se harán responsables de financiar el reciclaje (más bien las cantidades fijadas en metas), y donde los recicladores, esperamos todos, serán contratados como cooperativas y podrán vender sus residuos a mejores precios. 

En Colombia el gobierno habla de las alianzas “público populares” para seguir integrando a mayores segmentos de la población en las acciones que se quieren llevar a cabo, por ejemplo las del programa Basura Cero. Es ahí donde los recicladores de la ANR observan cautelosos para que esto se cumpla sin dejarlos fuera, para que efectivamente sean un actor más con la misma participación y capacidad de decisión, y no simplemente un grupo al que se incluye por caridad. Allí es donde el movimiento chileno de recicladores coincide y comparte la misma preocupación, donde a solo meses (septiembre) que entre en rigor la ley 20.920, tenemos que estar todos atentos a la real integración de los recicladores. 

1  Evaluación de Desempeño Ambiental de Chile (OCDE, 2016)

 

On the first annual United Nations International Day of Zero Waste on March 30, the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) has released a public declaration signed on by over 250 organizations in almost 60 countries representing zero waste practitioners, policy experts, and community groups. The declaration defines the principles and essential components of “zero waste” that governments must adhere to in order to successfully tackle our global waste problems.


English

DECLARATION

INTERNATIONAL ZERO WASTE DAY

30 March 2023

Zero waste to transform the world!

The Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives, GAIA, is a network of grassroots groups and national and regional alliances representing more than 1000 organizations from 92 countries building a future that protects nature instead of turning it into waste. We work to change personal and collective practices through popular education, community organizing, implementation of zero waste systems, and public policy advocacy at local, national, and international levels. 

We are overjoyed with the United Nations’ decision to proclaim March 30th as International Day of Zero Waste. This recognition of the importance of zero waste  reflects decades of socio-environmental activism, led by organizations around the world working side by side with the communities most impacted by environmental and social injustices caused by a global system of overproduction and consumption of natural resources.

On a day like today we want to reaffirm that zero waste is the conservation of all resources by means of responsible production, consumption, reuse, and recovery of products, packaging, and materials without burning and with no discharges to land, water, or air that threaten the environment or human health.

As organizations at the forefront of zero waste principles and strategies, we want to emphasize that any program that uses the term,”zero waste” must keep the focus first and foremost on reducing and preventing waste, through the following actions:

  • Invest resources and issue policies that prevent waste generation and disposal.
  • Minimize disposable products and find ways to replace them with durable, reusable  alternatives.
  • Develop ways of distributing products without the use of disposable packaging, using packaging made of materials that are easy and safe to reuse or failing that, recycle or reinsert into biological cycles at the end of a long  lifespan.
  • Transform the production system to manufacture  necessary, durable, and repairable products first and foremost, or at minimum , made of biodegradable or safely recyclable materials.
  • Promote the development of local economies that shorten the distance between those who produce and those who consume, favouring the use of returnable and washable packaging and the sale of products in bulk.
  • Reclaim people’s food sovereignty– growing toxics-free, healthy  food to feed and not just to profit, minimizing food waste and redistributing surplus food before it loses its nutritional qualities.
  • Where recyclable discards are generated, manage them locally, and where waste workers groups or cooperatives exist, involve them in the whole waste management system.
  • Recognize the role and contribution of grassroots waste workers and waste pickers in the zero waste system.
  • Avoid as much as possible the use of synthetic fibres in clothing and textiles, and confront the wastefulness of “fast fashion.” 
  • Avoid waste exports that perpetuate colonialism, injustice and inequity. 
  • Eliminate waste incineration – in any form – from waste management programmes.

In short, zero waste means extracting from nature only what we need, and ensuring that all communities flourish, while  respecting planetary boundaries for regenerate what we take, and to absorb what we give back to nature.

The organizations signing this declaration call on United Nations Member States to join our efforts to build zero waste initiatives in all corners of the planet. These initiatives must restore justice to the communities that bear the burden of pollution from waste disposal, the extraction of virgin raw materials, and industrial manufacturing processes, and above all restore justice to nature, without which there  is no future for humanity.

Lead Signatories:

GAIA Global

GAIA Africa

GAIA Asia Pacific

GAIA Latin America and the Caribbean

GAIA US & Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Signatories:

Acción Ecologica, Mexico

AEEFG, Tunisia

Agrovivas, Ecuador

Agrupación deportiva y social nueva huiscapi, Chile

Alaska Community Action on Toxics, USA

Aliança Resíduo Zero Brasil, Brazil

Alianza Basura Cero, Chile

Alianza Basura Cero Ecuador, Ecuador

Alianza de Derecho Ambiental y Agua, Guatemala 

Alliance of Mission-Based Recyclers (AMBR), USA

Alto al ecocidio en el río Tula, México

AMAES Asociación Mujeres Ambientalista El Salvador, El Salvador

American Environmnetal Health Studies Project, USA

Anef Araucania, Chile

ANFUSEN, Chile

Antu kai Mawen, Chile

Aotearoa Plastic Pollution Alliance, New Zealand

Apoena Socioambiental, Brazil

Asociación CEIBA, Guatemala

Asociación de funcionarios/as del INDH, Chile

Asociación de Sindicalistas de Emcali “ASOSIEMCALI, Colombia

Asociación Ecológica Santo Tomás A.:C., México

asociación movimiento nacional de recicladores de chile ANARCH, Chile

Azul, USA

Bangon Kalikasan Ecology Centers, Philippines

Berkeley Ecology Center, USA

Bio Vision Africa (BiVA), Uganda

Bios Argentina Nodo Tandil, Argentina

Blue Dalian, China

Boomerang Alliance, Australia

Break Free From Plastic (BFFP), Global

Breathe Free Detroit, USA

BYO – US Reduces, USA

Cafeteria Culture, USA

Center for Public Health and Environmental Development (CEPHED), Nepal

Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology, Philippines

Centre for Earth works (CFEW), Nigeria

Centre for Financial Accountability, India

Cepa, Chile

CESTA AT El Salvador, El Salvador

CETAAR, Argentina

CHENAI PROJECTS GROUP, Zimbabwe

Circular Communities Cymru, United Kingdom

Circular Economy Portugal, Portugal

Clean Air Action Network of Glens Falls (NY), USA

Climate Crisis Policy, USA

Club Andino Chillán, Chile

Coletivo PanVerde, Brazil

Coletivo SOS Barueri, Brazil

Community Based Research Laboratory, Canada

Comunidad indígena tripaiñan, Chile

CONFETAM CUT, Brazil

Consumers’ Association of Penang, Malaysia

Coopcamate, Brazil

Cooperativa de Trabajo Asociado Planeta Verde, Colombia

Corporate Hippie Inc, USA

CSARO: Community Sanitation and Recycling Organization, Cambodia

Dr Lubna Sarwath, India

Društvo Ekologi brez meja, Slovenia

Echotopia LLC, USA

Eco Circular India Foundation, India

Ecology Center, USA

Ecosoum, Mongolia

ECOTON, Indonesia

End Plastic Pollution – Uganda, Uganda

Environment and Social Development Organization-ESDO, Bangladesh

Environmental Agency of Central Lombok, Indonesia

Fala Lamo Art, North Maluku, Indonesia

Frente Brasileira Alternativas à Incineração, Brazil

FreshWater Accountabiity Project, USA

Front Commun pour la Protection de l’Environnement et des Espaces Protégés, (FCPEEP-RDC), Democratic Republic of the Congo

fundación Aguaclara, Venezuela 

Fundación Apaztle, Mexico

Fundación Basura, Chile

Fundación El Árbol, Chile

Fundacion Lenga, Chile

Fundación Siendo, Argentina

Fundaron DRECCA, Colombia 

GAIA Africa, South Africa

GMTex – Indústria de Confecções Ltda, Brazil

GovAmb/IEE/USP, Brazil

Green Vientiane , Laos

Greenaction for Health and Environmental Justice, USA

Greeners Action, Hong Kong

Greenpeace, Global

Health Environment and Climate Action Foundation (HECAF 360), Nepal

HENDRA, Indonesia

Humusz Szövetség, Hungary

Indap, Chile

Innovation for life Group -INNOLIF GROUP, Tanzania

INSEA – Instituto Nenuca de Desenvolvimento Sustentável, Brazil

Institute for Local Self-Reliance, USA

Institution of Community Study and Empowerment/LP2M, Indonesia

Instituto ATEMIS – Análise do Trabalho e das Mutações Industriais e dos Serviços, Brazil

Instituto de Derecho Ambiental de Honduras (IDAMHO), Honduras

Instituto Pólis, Brazil

Jaringan Perempuan Pesisir Sulawesi Tenggara, Indonesia

Joint Action for Water, India

Kader Hijau Muhammadiyah, Indonesia

Karoi Zero Waste Consortium, Zimbabwe

Korea Zero Waste Movement Network, Republic of Korea

L’ets d’obit Congo, Congo

LA2PM HAN, Indonesia

Lekeh Development Foundation, Nigeria

Let’s Do It! Togo, Togo

Let´s Do It Foundation, Estonia

Loncoche Suma y Avanza, Chile

LP 21, Indonesia

Mi Jardinerita , Ecuador

Mother Earth Foundation, Philippines

Movieco, Brasil

Movimento Nacional dos Catadores de Materiais Recicláveis, Brasil

NEB | noesbasura.com, Mexico

NGO Zero Waste Montenegro, Montenegro

Nipe Fagio, Tanzania

No plastic in my sea, France

North Country Earth Action, USA

Nothing Left to Waste, USA

NoWaste Surabaya, Indonesia

Núcleo Alter-Nativas de Produção – UFMG, Brasil

NY Environmental Watch, USA

Observatório da Politica Nacional de Resíduos Sólidos, Brasil

Observatório da Reciclagem Inclusiva e Solidária, Brasil

Observatorio de Ecología Política de Venezuela, Venezuela 

Oceana, Brasil

Oceana Philippines International, Philippines

ONG Colectivo VientoSur, Chile

ONG Verde Urbano, Chile

Parisar, India

ParyavaranMitra, India

PCRZ, Spain

Plastic Change, Denmark

Plastic Free Future, USA

Plastic Pollution Coalition, USA

Plastic Soup Surfer, Netherlands

PlataformaCiutadana Residu Zero, Catalunya

PPLH Bali (Environmental Education Center), Indonesia

Preservar Ambiental, Brasil

Pro Public, Nepal

Projeto Hospitais Saudáveis, Brasil

RAPAL, América del Sur

RAPAL Uruguay, Uruguay

Red de Acción por los Derechos Ambientales RADA, Chile

Rede Lixo Zero Santa Tereza, Brasil

Regenerative Solutions, USA

Returning Organics to Soils, Australia

REWIND / River Warrior Indonesia, Indonesia

Rezero, Spain

River valley Organizing, USA

RM Engineering, USA

Rotary Club de Cotia Mulheres Empreendedoras, Brazil

Sahabat Alam Malaysia (Friends of the Earth), Malaysia

Save the Med Foundation, Spain

Sierra Club, Puerto Rico

SMAN 1Kuantan Mudik Provinsi Riau, Indonesia

Sociedade Ecológica Amigos Do Embu – SEAE, Brazil

Solidaridad Temuco, Chile

Sound Resource Management Group, Inc., USA

South African Waste Pickers Association, South Africa

Story of Stuff Project, USA

Surfrider Foundation Australia, Australia

Surfrider South Coast, Australia

Sustainable Environment Development Initiative, Nigeria

Swach Pune Seva Sahakari Sanstha Maryadit, India

Synergis – Zero Waste Group, USA

Taiwan Zero Waste Association, Taiwan

Taller de Comunicación Ambiental (Rosario), Argentina

Taller Ecologista, Argentina

Thanal, India

The Center for Applied Research and People’s Engagement, India

The Earth Bill Network, USA

The Good Tribe, Sweden

The Green Earth, Hong Kong

the Indonesia Plastic Bag Diet Movement, Indonesia

The Last Plastic Straw, Global

The Repurpose Project, USA

The Rubbish Trip, New Zealand

Tomate Rojo, Chile

ToxicsWatch, India

Toxisphera Associação de Saúde Ambiental, Brazil

Trash, Argentina

Trash Hero Thailand, Thailand

Trash Hero World, Global

Ultimate Support for Self Initiatives, Tanzania

UNICATA University for and with Waste Pickers, Brazil

United Kingdom Without Incineration Network (UKWIN), United Kingdom

UNTAG Semarang, Indonesia

Urban Ore, Inc., USA

Vietnam Zero Waste Alliance, Vietnam

VOICE of Irish Concern for the Environment, Ireland

WALHI North Sumatra, Indonesia

WALHI/Friends of the Earth Indonesia, Indonesia 

War on Waste Negros Oriental, Philippines

Waukesha County Environmental Action League, USA

Work on Waste, USA (AEHSP)

Yaksa Pelestari Bumi Berkelanjutan (YPBB), Indonesia

Yana Ferments, Ecuador

Yayasan Cipta Abdi Bangsa, Indonesia

YPBB, Indonesia

Zelena akcija / Friends of the Earth Croatia, Croatia

ZERO – Associação Sistema Terrestre Sustentável, Portugal

Zero Waste 4 Zero Burning, Canada

Zero Waste Association of South Africa (“ZWASA”)

Zero Waste Australia and the National Toxics Network Australia

Zero Waste BC, Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Zero Waste International Trust, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Ithaca, USA

Zero Waste Lviv, Ukraine

Zero Waste Montgomery County, USA

Zero Waste Network Aotearoa, New Zealand

Zero Waste North West, Ireland

Zero Waste Schools Wales CIC, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Society, Ukraine

Zero Waste USA

ZWIA, Global

Center for Biological Diversity, USA

Zero Waste Alliance Ukraine

Cooperativa maos dadas, Global

Fundación Alianza en el Desarrollo, Ecuador

Upstream, USA

LP 21, Indonesia


Español

DECLARACIÓN

DÍA INTERNACIONAL BASURA CERO

30 de marzo 2023

¡Basura cero para transformar el mundo!

La Alianza Global por Alternativas a la Incineración, GAIA, es una red de grupos de base y alianzas nacionales y regionales que representan a más de 1000 organizaciones de 92 países, que trabajamos construyendo un futuro donde protejamos la naturaleza en lugar de transformarla en basura. Trabajamos para cambiar prácticas personales y colectivas a través de la educación popular, organización comunitaria, implementación de sistemas basura cero y la promoción de políticas públicas a nivel local, nacional e internacional. 

Con satisfacción nos enteramos de la decisión de Naciones Unidas de proclamar el 30 de marzo como el Día Mundial Basura Cero. El reconocimiento de la relevancia de este enfoque es el reflejo de más de dos décadas de activismo socioambiental liderado por organizaciones de todo el mundo que trabajan codo a codo con las comunidades más afectadas por la injusticia ambiental y social provocada por el sistema global de producción que extrae naturaleza para fabricar bienes de consumo masivo que se terminan transformando en basura.

En un día como hoy queremos reiterar que basura cero es la conservación de la naturaleza mediante la producción, el consumo, la reutilización y la recuperación responsables de productos, envases y materiales sin quemarlos y sin descargarlos al suelo, al agua o al aire, para que no amenacen el medio ambiente ni la salud humana.

Como organizaciones en la primera línea de los principios y estrategias basura cero, queremos enfatizar que todo programa que use este término debe mantener el foco primordialmente en reducir y prevenir la generación de basura. A nivel global y local, esto lo lograremos  mediante las siguientes acciones:

  • Invertir prioritariamente los recursos en la prevención de la generación y la disposición final de la basura, y establecer políticas que así lo mandaten.
  • Restringir al mínimo los productos desechables y buscar la forma de reemplazarlos por productos durables y reutilizables.
  • Desarrollar formas de distribución de productos sin el uso de envases desechables, en envases de materiales fáciles y seguros de reciclar o reinsertar en ciclos biológicos (devolviéndolos al suelo como nutrientes) al final de una larga vida útil.
  • Transformar el sistema productivo para que se fabriquen solo productos con durabilidad garantizada, reparables, realmente necesarios, y de materiales biodegradables o reciclables de manera segura.
  • Promover el desarrollo de economías locales que acorten las distancias entre quienes producen y quienes consumen, favoreciendo el uso de envases retornables y lavables y la venta de productos a granel.
  • Recuperar la soberanía alimentaria de los pueblos, cultivando alimentos sanos y libres de tóxicos para alimentar y no solo para lucrar, reduciendo al mínimo el desperdicio de alimentos y redistribuyendo los excedentes de comida antes de que pierdan sus cualidades nutritivas.
  • Cuando se generen residuos reciclables, estos deben ser gestionados de forma local, y preferentemente por agrupaciones o cooperativas de recicladoras y recicladores de base cuando estas existan. 
  • Reconocer el rol y la contribución de las y los recicladores de base en todo el sistema de manejo de residuos, proveyéndoles los medios para realizar su trabajo de manera segura y digna.
  • Evitar al máximo el uso de fibras sintéticas en la fabricación de ropa y textiles, reconociendo los daños que genera la sobreproducción de ropa a través de estrategias comerciales como el “fast fashion”. 
  • Detener la exportación de basura cuando ésta perpetúa el colonialismo, las injusticias y la inequidad. 
  • Eliminar la incineración de la basura -en cualquiera de sus formas- de los programas de gestión de residuos.

En resumen, basura cero significa extraer de la naturaleza solo lo que necesitamos, asegurando que todas las comunidades puedan florecer, y sin sobrepasar los límites planetarios para regenerar lo que tomamos y absorber lo que devolvemos. 

Hacemos un llamado a los gobiernos del mundo, y a la Organización de Naciones Unidas a promover y adoptar estas estrategias, para comenzar a reparar la relación de la humanidad  con el planeta, recuperando la viabilidad de nuestras sociedades en un momento de profundas y múltiples  crisis ambientales. Alcanzar la suficiencia, resiliencia y el bienestar para todas las personas que habitamos el planeta, es fundamental para ello. 

Las organizaciones que firmamos esta declaración profundizaremos nuestros esfuerzos trabajando con más entusiasmo por la implementación de iniciativas basura cero en todos los rincones del planeta. Dispondremos todas nuestras herramientas ciudadanas de educación popular e incidencia en políticas públicas, para hacer justicia a las comunidades que hoy cargan con el peso de los impactos de la disposición final de la basura, de la extracción de materia prima virgen y de los procesos industriales de manufactura, y sobre todo para hacer justicia a la naturaleza, pues sin ella no hay futuro deseable para la humanidad.

Signatorios principales

GAIA Global

GAIA Africa

GAIA Asia Pacific

GAIA Latin America and the Caribbean

GAIA US & Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Signatorios:

Acción Ecologica, Mexico

AEEFG, Tunisia

Agrovivas, Ecuador

Agrupación deportiva y social nueva huiscapi, Chile

Alaska Community Action on Toxics, USA

Aliança Resíduo Zero Brasil, Brazil

Alianza Basura Cero, Chile

Alianza Basura Cero Ecuador, Ecuador

Alianza de Derecho Ambiental y Agua, Guatemala 

Alliance of Mission-Based Recyclers (AMBR), USA

Alto al ecocidio en el río Tula, México

AMAES Asociación Mujeres Ambientalista El Salvador, El Salvador

American Environmnetal Health Studies Project, USA

Anef Araucania, Chile

ANFUSEN, Chile

Antu kai Mawen, Chile

Aotearoa Plastic Pollution Alliance, New Zealand

Apoena Socioambiental, Brazil

Asociación CEIBA, Guatemala

Asociación de funcionarios/as del INDH, Chile

Asociación de Sindicalistas de Emcali “ASOSIEMCALI, Colombia

Asociación Ecológica Santo Tomás A.:C., México

asociación movimiento nacional de recicladores de chile ANARCH, Chile

Azul, USA

Bangon Kalikasan Ecology Centers, Philippines

Berkeley Ecology Center, USA

Bio Vision Africa (BiVA), Uganda

Bios Argentina Nodo Tandil, Argentina

Blue Dalian, China

Boomerang Alliance, Australia

Break Free From Plastic (BFFP), Global

Breathe Free Detroit, USA

BYO – US Reduces, USA

Cafeteria Culture, USA

Center for Public Health and Environmental Development (CEPHED), Nepal

Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology, Philippines

Centre for Earth works (CFEW), Nigeria

Centre for Financial Accountability, India

Cepa, Chile

CESTA AT El Salvador, El Salvador

CETAAR, Argentina

CHENAI PROJECTS GROUP, Zimbabwe

Circular Communities Cymru, United Kingdom

Circular Economy Portugal, Portugal

Clean Air Action Network of Glens Falls (NY), USA

Climate Crisis Policy, USA

Club Andino Chillán, Chile

Coletivo PanVerde, Brazil

Coletivo SOS Barueri, Brazil

Community Based Research Laboratory, Canada

Comunidad indígena tripaiñan, Chile

CONFETAM CUT, Brazil

Consumers’ Association of Penang, Malaysia

Coopcamate, Brazil

Cooperativa de Trabajo Asociado Planeta Verde, Colombia

Corporate Hippie Inc, USA

CSARO: Community Sanitation and Recycling Organization, Cambodia

Dr Lubna Sarwath, India

Društvo Ekologi brez meja, Slovenia

Echotopia LLC, USA

Eco Circular India Foundation, India

Ecology Center, USA

Ecosoum, Mongolia

ECOTON, Indonesia

End Plastic Pollution – Uganda, Uganda

Environment and Social Development Organization-ESDO, Bangladesh

Environmental Agency of Central Lombok, Indonesia

Fala Lamo Art, North Maluku, Indonesia

Frente Brasileira Alternativas à Incineração, Brazil

FreshWater Accountabiity Project, USA

Front Commun pour la Protection de l’Environnement et des Espaces Protégés, (FCPEEP-RDC), Democratic Republic of the Congo

fundación Aguaclara, Venezuela 

Fundación Apaztle, Mexico

Fundación Basura, Chile

Fundación El Árbol, Chile

Fundacion Lenga, Chile

Fundación Siendo, Argentina

Fundaron DRECCA, Colombia 

GAIA Africa, South Africa

GMTex – Indústria de Confecções Ltda, Brazil

GovAmb/IEE/USP, Brazil

Green Vientiane , Laos

Greenaction for Health and Environmental Justice, USA

Greeners Action, Hong Kong

Greenpeace, Global

Health Environment and Climate Action Foundation (HECAF 360), Nepal

HENDRA, Indonesia

Humusz Szövetség, Hungary

Indap, Chile

Innovation for life Group -INNOLIF GROUP, Tanzania

INSEA – Instituto Nenuca de Desenvolvimento Sustentável, Brazil

Institute for Local Self-Reliance, USA

Institution of Community Study and Empowerment/LP2M, Indonesia

Instituto ATEMIS – Análise do Trabalho e das Mutações Industriais e dos Serviços, Brazil

Instituto de Derecho Ambiental de Honduras (IDAMHO), Honduras

Instituto Pólis, Brazil

Jaringan Perempuan Pesisir Sulawesi Tenggara, Indonesia

Joint Action for Water, India

Kader Hijau Muhammadiyah, Indonesia

Karoi Zero Waste Consortium, Zimbabwe

Korea Zero Waste Movement Network, Republic of Korea

L’ets d’obit Congo, Congo

LA2PM HAN, Indonesia

Lekeh Development Foundation, Nigeria

Let’s Do It! Togo, Togo

Let´s Do It Foundation, Estonia

Loncoche Suma y Avanza, Chile

LP 21, Indonesia

Mi Jardinerita , Ecuador

Mother Earth Foundation, Philippines

Movieco, Brasil

Movimento Nacional dos Catadores de Materiais Recicláveis, Brasil

NEB | noesbasura.com, Mexico

NGO Zero Waste Montenegro, Montenegro

Nipe Fagio, Tanzania

No plastic in my sea, France

North Country Earth Action, USA

Nothing Left to Waste, USA

NoWaste Surabaya, Indonesia

Núcleo Alter-Nativas de Produção – UFMG, Brasil

NY Environmental Watch, USA

Observatório da Politica Nacional de Resíduos Sólidos, Brasil

Observatório da Reciclagem Inclusiva e Solidária, Brasil

Observatorio de Ecología Política de Venezuela, Venezuela 

Oceana, Brasil

Oceana Philippines International, Philippines

ONG Colectivo VientoSur, Chile

ONG Verde Urbano, Chile

Parisar, India

ParyavaranMitra, India

PCRZ, Spain

Plastic Change, Denmark

Plastic Free Future, USA

Plastic Pollution Coalition, USA

Plastic Soup Surfer, Netherlands

PlataformaCiutadana Residu Zero, Catalunya

PPLH Bali (Environmental Education Center), Indonesia

Preservar Ambiental, Brasil

Pro Public, Nepal

Projeto Hospitais Saudáveis, Brasil

RAPAL, América del Sur

RAPAL Uruguay, Uruguay

Red de Acción por los Derechos Ambientales RADA, Chile

Rede Lixo Zero Santa Tereza, Brasil

Regenerative Solutions, USA

Returning Organics to Soils, Australia

REWIND / River Warrior Indonesia, Indonesia

Rezero, Spain

River valley Organizing, USA

RM Engineering, USA

Rotary Club de Cotia Mulheres Empreendedoras, Brazil

Sahabat Alam Malaysia (Friends of the Earth), Malaysia

Save the Med Foundation, Spain

Sierra Club, Puerto Rico

SMAN 1Kuantan Mudik Provinsi Riau, Indonesia

Sociedade Ecológica Amigos Do Embu – SEAE, Brazil

Solidaridad Temuco, Chile

Sound Resource Management Group, Inc., USA

South African Waste Pickers Association, South Africa

Story of Stuff Project, USA

Surfrider Foundation Australia, Australia

Surfrider South Coast, Australia

Sustainable Environment Development Initiative, Nigeria

Swach Pune Seva Sahakari Sanstha Maryadit, India

Synergis – Zero Waste Group, USA

Taiwan Zero Waste Association, Taiwan

Taller de Comunicación Ambiental (Rosario), Argentina

Taller Ecologista, Argentina

Thanal, India

The Center for Applied Research and People’s Engagement, India

The Earth Bill Network, USA

The Good Tribe, Sweden

The Green Earth, Hong Kong

the Indonesia Plastic Bag Diet Movement, Indonesia

The Last Plastic Straw, Global

The Repurpose Project, USA

The Rubbish Trip, New Zealand

Tomate Rojo, Chile

ToxicsWatch, India

Toxisphera Associação de Saúde Ambiental, Brazil

Trash, Argentina

Trash Hero Thailand, Thailand

Trash Hero World, Global

Ultimate Support for Self Initiatives, Tanzania

UNICATA University for and with Waste Pickers, Brazil

United Kingdom Without Incineration Network (UKWIN), United Kingdom

UNTAG Semarang, Indonesia

Urban Ore, Inc., USA

Vietnam Zero Waste Alliance, Vietnam

VOICE of Irish Concern for the Environment, Ireland

WALHI North Sumatra, Indonesia

WALHI/Friends of the Earth Indonesia, Indonesia 

War on Waste Negros Oriental, Philippines

Waukesha County Environmental Action League, USA

Work on Waste, USA (AEHSP)

Yaksa Pelestari Bumi Berkelanjutan (YPBB), Indonesia

Yana Ferments, Ecuador

Yayasan Cipta Abdi Bangsa, Indonesia

YPBB, Indonesia

Zelena akcija / Friends of the Earth Croatia, Croatia

ZERO – Associação Sistema Terrestre Sustentável, Portugal

Zero Waste 4 Zero Burning, Canada

Zero Waste Association of South Africa (“ZWASA”)

Zero Waste Australia and the National Toxics Network Australia

Zero Waste BC, Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Zero Waste International Trust, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Ithaca, USA

Zero Waste Lviv, Ukraine

Zero Waste Montgomery County, USA

Zero Waste Network Aotearoa, New Zealand

Zero Waste North West, Ireland

Zero Waste Schools Wales CIC, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Society, Ukraine

Zero Waste USA

ZWIA, Global

Center for Biological Diversity, USA

Zero Waste Alliance Ukraine

Cooperativa maos dadas, Global

Fundación Alianza en el Desarrollo, Ecuador

Upstream, USA

LP 21, Indonesia


português (Brasil)

DECLARAÇÃO

DIA INTERNACIONAL RESÍDUO ZERO

 30 de março 2023

 Resíduo Zero para transformar o mundo!

A Aliança Global por Alternativas a Incineração, GAIA, é uma rede de grupos e alianças de base nacionais e regionais que representam mais de 1000 organizações de 92 países, trabalhando para construir um futuro em que protegemos a natureza sem a transformar em resíduos. Trabalhamos para mudar as práticas pessoais e coletivas através da educação popular, organização comunitária, implementação de sistemas de resíduo zero e defesa de políticas públicas a nível local, nacional e internacional.

 Ficámos contentes por saber da decisão das Nações Unidas de proclamar o dia 30 de março como Dia Mundial do Resíduos Zero. O reconhecimento da relevância desta abordagem é um reflexo de mais de duas décadas de ativismo socioambiental liderado por organizações em todo o mundo que trabalham lado a lado com as comunidades mais afetadas pela injustiça ambiental e social causada pelo sistema de produção global que extrai a natureza para fabricar bens de consumo em massa que acabam por se transformar em resíduos.

 Num dia como hoje, queremos reiterar que o resíduo zero é a conservação da natureza através da produção, consumo, reutilização e recuperação responsável de produtos, embalagens e materiais sem os queimar e sem os descarregar no solo, água ou ar, para que não ameacem o ambiente ou a saúde humana.

 Como organizações na vanguarda dos princípios e estratégias de resíduos zero, queremos salientar que qualquer programa que utilize este termo deve manter o foco principalmente na redução e prevenção da geração de resíduos. A nível global e local, consegui-lo-emos através das seguintes ações:

●  Dar prioridade ao investimento de recursos na prevenção da geração e eliminação de resíduos, e estabelecer políticas que o obriguem a isso.

●  Restringir ao mínimo os produtos descartáveis e procurar formas de os substituir por produtos duráveis e reutilizáveis.

● Desenvolver formas de distribuição de produtos sem a utilização de embalagens descartáveis, em embalagens feitas de materiais fáceis e seguros de reciclar ou reinserir em ciclos biológicos (devolvendo-os ao solo como nutrientes) no final de uma longa vida útil.

● Transformar o sistema de produção de modo a que apenas sejam produzidos produtos com durabilidade garantida, reparáveis, verdadeiramente necessários e feitos de materiais biodegradáveis ou recicláveis em segurança.

● Promover o desenvolvimento de economias locais que encurtam a distância entre quem produz e quem consome, favorecendo a utilização de embalagens retornáveis e laváveis e a venda de produtos a granel.

● Recuperar a soberania alimentar dos povos, cultivando alimentos saudáveis e sem toxinas para alimentar e não apenas para lucrar, minimizando o resíduo alimentar e redistribuindo os excedentes alimentares antes que estes percam as suas qualidades nutricionais.

● Quando são produzidos resíduos recicláveis, estes devem ser geridos localmente, e de preferência por grupos de recolha e reciclagem de base ou cooperativas onde existam.

● Reconhecer o papel e a contribuição dos recolhedores de materiais recicláveis de base em todo o sistema de gestão de resíduos, fornecendo-lhes os meios para realizarem o seu trabalho de uma forma segura e digna.

● Evitar tanto quanto possível a utilização de fibras sintéticas na fabricação de vestuário e têxteis, reconhecendo os danos causados pela produção excessiva de vestuário através de estratégias comerciais como a “moda rápida”.

● Parar a exportação de lixo quando perpetua o colonialismo, a injustiça e a desigualdade.

● Eliminar a incineração de resíduos – sob qualquer forma – dos programas de gestão de resíduos.

 Em resumo, resíduo zero significa extrair da natureza apenas o que precisamos, assegurando que todas as comunidades possam florescer, e não ultrapassar os limites planetários para regenerar o que tomamos e absorver o que devolvemos.

Apelamos aos governos do mundo e às Nações Unidas para que promovam e adotem estas estratégias para começar a reparar a relação da humanidade com o planeta, restaurando a viabilidade das nossas sociedades numa época de crises ambientais profundas e múltiplas. Alcançar a suficiência, resiliência e bem-estar para todas as pessoas do planeta é fundamental para isso.

 As organizações que assinaram esta declaração irão intensificar os nossos esforços, trabalhando com mais entusiasmo para a implementação de iniciativas de resíduos zero em todos os cantos do planeta. Utilizaremos todas as nossas ferramentas de educação popular e defesa de políticas públicas para fazer justiça às comunidades que hoje suportam o fardo dos impactos da eliminação de resíduos, da extração de matérias-primas virgens e dos processos de fabricação industrial, e acima de tudo para fazer justiça à natureza, pois sem ela não há futuro desejável para a humanidade.

Principais signatários

GAIA Global

GAIA Africa

GAIA Asia Pacific

GAIA Latin America and the Caribbean

GAIA US & Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Signatários:

Acción Ecologica, Mexico

AEEFG, Tunisia

Agrovivas, Ecuador

Agrupación deportiva y social nueva huiscapi, Chile

Alaska Community Action on Toxics, USA

Aliança Resíduo Zero Brasil, Brazil

Alianza Basura Cero, Chile

Alianza Basura Cero Ecuador, Ecuador

Alianza de Derecho Ambiental y Agua, Guatemala 

Alliance of Mission-Based Recyclers (AMBR), USA

Alto al ecocidio en el río Tula, México

AMAES Asociación Mujeres Ambientalista El Salvador, El Salvador

American Environmnetal Health Studies Project, USA

Anef Araucania, Chile

ANFUSEN, Chile

Antu kai Mawen, Chile

Aotearoa Plastic Pollution Alliance, New Zealand

Apoena Socioambiental, Brazil

Asociación CEIBA, Guatemala

Asociación de funcionarios/as del INDH, Chile

Asociación de Sindicalistas de Emcali “ASOSIEMCALI, Colombia

Asociación Ecológica Santo Tomás A.:C., México

asociación movimiento nacional de recicladores de chile ANARCH, Chile

Azul, USA

Bangon Kalikasan Ecology Centers, Philippines

Berkeley Ecology Center, USA

Bio Vision Africa (BiVA), Uganda

Bios Argentina Nodo Tandil, Argentina

Blue Dalian, China

Boomerang Alliance, Australia

Break Free From Plastic (BFFP), Global

Breathe Free Detroit, USA

BYO – US Reduces, USA

Cafeteria Culture, USA

Center for Public Health and Environmental Development (CEPHED), Nepal

Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology, Philippines

Centre for Earth works (CFEW), Nigeria

Centre for Financial Accountability, India

Cepa, Chile

CESTA AT El Salvador, El Salvador

CETAAR, Argentina

CHENAI PROJECTS GROUP, Zimbabwe

Circular Communities Cymru, United Kingdom

Circular Economy Portugal, Portugal

Clean Air Action Network of Glens Falls (NY), USA

Climate Crisis Policy, USA

Club Andino Chillán, Chile

Coletivo PanVerde, Brazil

Coletivo SOS Barueri, Brazil

Community Based Research Laboratory, Canada

Comunidad indígena tripaiñan, Chile

CONFETAM CUT, Brazil

Consumers’ Association of Penang, Malaysia

Coopcamate, Brazil

Cooperativa de Trabajo Asociado Planeta Verde, Colombia

Corporate Hippie Inc, USA

CSARO: Community Sanitation and Recycling Organization, Cambodia

Dr Lubna Sarwath, India

Društvo Ekologi brez meja, Slovenia

Echotopia LLC, USA

Eco Circular India Foundation, India

Ecology Center, USA

Ecosoum, Mongolia

ECOTON, Indonesia

End Plastic Pollution – Uganda, Uganda

Environment and Social Development Organization-ESDO, Bangladesh

Environmental Agency of Central Lombok, Indonesia

Fala Lamo Art, North Maluku, Indonesia

Frente Brasileira Alternativas à Incineração, Brazil

FreshWater Accountabiity Project, USA

Front Commun pour la Protection de l’Environnement et des Espaces Protégés, (FCPEEP-RDC), Democratic Republic of the Congo

fundación Aguaclara, Venezuela 

Fundación Apaztle, Mexico

Fundación Basura, Chile

Fundación El Árbol, Chile

Fundacion Lenga, Chile

Fundación Siendo, Argentina

Fundaron DRECCA, Colombia 

GAIA Africa, South Africa

GMTex – Indústria de Confecções Ltda, Brazil

GovAmb/IEE/USP, Brazil

Green Vientiane , Laos

Greenaction for Health and Environmental Justice, USA

Greeners Action, Hong Kong

Greenpeace, Global

Health Environment and Climate Action Foundation (HECAF 360), Nepal

HENDRA, Indonesia

Humusz Szövetség, Hungary

Indap, Chile

Innovation for life Group -INNOLIF GROUP, Tanzania

INSEA – Instituto Nenuca de Desenvolvimento Sustentável, Brazil

Institute for Local Self-Reliance, USA

Institution of Community Study and Empowerment/LP2M, Indonesia

Instituto ATEMIS – Análise do Trabalho e das Mutações Industriais e dos Serviços, Brazil

Instituto de Derecho Ambiental de Honduras (IDAMHO), Honduras

Instituto Pólis, Brazil

Jaringan Perempuan Pesisir Sulawesi Tenggara, Indonesia

Joint Action for Water, India

Kader Hijau Muhammadiyah, Indonesia

Karoi Zero Waste Consortium, Zimbabwe

Korea Zero Waste Movement Network, Republic of Korea

L’ets d’obit Congo, Congo

LA2PM HAN, Indonesia

Lekeh Development Foundation, Nigeria

Let’s Do It! Togo, Togo

Let´s Do It Foundation, Estonia

Loncoche Suma y Avanza, Chile

LP 21, Indonesia

Mi Jardinerita , Ecuador

Mother Earth Foundation, Philippines

Movieco, Brasil

Movimento Nacional dos Catadores de Materiais Recicláveis, Brasil

NEB | noesbasura.com, Mexico

NGO Zero Waste Montenegro, Montenegro

Nipe Fagio, Tanzania

No plastic in my sea, France

North Country Earth Action, USA

Nothing Left to Waste, USA

NoWaste Surabaya, Indonesia

Núcleo Alter-Nativas de Produção – UFMG, Brasil

NY Environmental Watch, USA

Observatório da Politica Nacional de Resíduos Sólidos, Brasil

Observatório da Reciclagem Inclusiva e Solidária, Brasil

Observatorio de Ecología Política de Venezuela, Venezuela 

Oceana, Brasil

Oceana Philippines International, Philippines

ONG Colectivo VientoSur, Chile

ONG Verde Urbano, Chile

Parisar, India

ParyavaranMitra, India

PCRZ, Spain

Plastic Change, Denmark

Plastic Free Future, USA

Plastic Pollution Coalition, USA

Plastic Soup Surfer, Netherlands

PlataformaCiutadana Residu Zero, Catalunya

PPLH Bali (Environmental Education Center), Indonesia

Preservar Ambiental, Brasil

Pro Public, Nepal

Projeto Hospitais Saudáveis, Brasil

RAPAL, América del Sur

RAPAL Uruguay, Uruguay

Red de Acción por los Derechos Ambientales RADA, Chile

Rede Lixo Zero Santa Tereza, Brasil

Regenerative Solutions, USA

Returning Organics to Soils, Australia

REWIND / River Warrior Indonesia, Indonesia

Rezero, Spain

River valley Organizing, USA

RM Engineering, USA

Rotary Club de Cotia Mulheres Empreendedoras, Brazil

Sahabat Alam Malaysia (Friends of the Earth), Malaysia

Save the Med Foundation, Spain

Sierra Club, Puerto Rico

SMAN 1Kuantan Mudik Provinsi Riau, Indonesia

Sociedade Ecológica Amigos Do Embu – SEAE, Brazil

Solidaridad Temuco, Chile

Sound Resource Management Group, Inc., USA

South African Waste Pickers Association, South Africa

Story of Stuff Project, USA

Surfrider Foundation Australia, Australia

Surfrider South Coast, Australia

Sustainable Environment Development Initiative, Nigeria

Swach Pune Seva Sahakari Sanstha Maryadit, India

Synergis – Zero Waste Group, USA

Taiwan Zero Waste Association, Taiwan

Taller de Comunicación Ambiental (Rosario), Argentina

Taller Ecologista, Argentina

Thanal, India

The Center for Applied Research and People’s Engagement, India

The Earth Bill Network, USA

The Good Tribe, Sweden

The Green Earth, Hong Kong

the Indonesia Plastic Bag Diet Movement, Indonesia

The Last Plastic Straw, Global

The Repurpose Project, USA

The Rubbish Trip, New Zealand

Tomate Rojo, Chile

ToxicsWatch, India

Toxisphera Associação de Saúde Ambiental, Brazil

Trash, Argentina

Trash Hero Thailand, Thailand

Trash Hero World, Global

Ultimate Support for Self Initiatives, Tanzania

UNICATA University for and with Waste Pickers, Brazil

United Kingdom Without Incineration Network (UKWIN), United Kingdom

UNTAG Semarang, Indonesia

Urban Ore, Inc., USA

Vietnam Zero Waste Alliance, Vietnam

VOICE of Irish Concern for the Environment, Ireland

WALHI North Sumatra, Indonesia

WALHI/Friends of the Earth Indonesia, Indonesia 

War on Waste Negros Oriental, Philippines

Waukesha County Environmental Action League, USA

Work on Waste, USA (AEHSP)

Yaksa Pelestari Bumi Berkelanjutan (YPBB), Indonesia

Yana Ferments, Ecuador

Yayasan Cipta Abdi Bangsa, Indonesia

YPBB, Indonesia

Zelena akcija / Friends of the Earth Croatia, Croatia

ZERO – Associação Sistema Terrestre Sustentável, Portugal

Zero Waste 4 Zero Burning, Canada

Zero Waste Association of South Africa (“ZWASA”)

Zero Waste Australia and the National Toxics Network Australia

Zero Waste BC, Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Zero Waste International Trust, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Ithaca, USA

Zero Waste Lviv, Ukraine

Zero Waste Montgomery County, USA

Zero Waste Network Aotearoa, New Zealand

Zero Waste North West, Ireland

Zero Waste Schools Wales CIC, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Society, Ukraine

Zero Waste USA

ZWIA, Global

Center for Biological Diversity, USA

Zero Waste Alliance Ukraine

Cooperativa maos dadas, Global

Fundación Alianza en el Desarrollo, Ecuador

Upstream, USA

LP 21, Indonesia


português (Europa)

DECLARAÇÃO

DIA INTERNACIONAL DO DESPERDÍCIO ZERO

30 de março de 2023

Desperdício zero para transformar o mundo!

A Aliança Global para Alternativas aos Incineradores, ou GAIA, é uma rede de grupos comunitários e de alianças nacionais e regionais que representa mais de 1000 organizações de 92 países e tem como objetivo construir um futuro que proteja a Natureza e não a transforme em resíduos. Trabalhamos no sentido de mudar as práticas pessoais e coletivas através da educação popular, organização comunitária, implementação de sistemas de desperdício zero e defesa de políticas públicas a nível local, nacional e internacional. 

Estamos profundamente contentes com o facto de as Nações Unidas terem decretado o dia 30 de março como sendo o Dia Internacional do Desperdício Zero. Este reconhecimento da importância do desperdício zero é o culminar de décadas de ativismo socioambiental liderado por organizações de todo o mundo em colaboração com as comunidades mais afetadas pelas injustiças ambientais e sociais originadas por um sistema global de sobreprodução e consumo de recursos naturais.

Neste dia, queremos reafirmar que o desperdício zero consiste na conservação da Natureza através da produção, do consumo, da reutilização e da valorização responsáveis de produtos, embalagens e materiais sem recurso à incineração nem a descargas para o solo, os recursos hídricos ou a atmosfera, que ameaçam o ambiente ou a saúde humana. 

Enquanto organizações na linha da frente dos princípios e das estratégias de desperdício zero, pretendemos salientar que qualquer programa que utilize a expressão «desperdício zero» tem de se focar, em primeira instância, na redução e prevenção de resíduos através das medidas que se seguem:

  • Investir recursos e elaborar políticas que evitem a geração e eliminação de resíduos.
  • Minimizar os produtos descartáveis e encontrar formas de os substituir por alternativas duradouras e reutilizáveis.
  • Desenvolver formas de distribuir produtos sem utilizar embalagens descartáveis, ou seja, recorrendo a embalagens compostas de materiais cuja reutilização é fácil e segura ou, se tal não for possível, que sejam passíveis de serem reciclados e reintroduzidos em ciclos biológicos no final de uma longa vida útil.
  • Transformar o sistema de produção para promover o fabrico de produtos que, acima de tudo, sejam necessários, duradouros e reparáveis ou que, pelo menos, sejam compostos de materiais biodegradáveis ou passíveis de serem reciclados de forma segura.
  • Promover o desenvolvimento de economias locais e, desta forma, encurtar a distância entre os produtores e os consumidores priorizando a utilização de embalagens laváveis e devolvíveis e a venda de produtos a granel.
  • Restituir a soberania das pessoas sobre os alimentos (cultivo de alimentos saudáveis e isentos de substâncias tóxicas com o objetivo de alimentar as pessoas e não de lucrar com isso, minimização do desperdício alimentar e redistribuição dos excedentes antes de perderem as suas qualidades nutricionais).
  • Gerir localmente o lixo reciclável que é produzido e envolver as cooperativas ou os grupos de catadores de lixo que possam existir em todo o sistema de gestão de resíduos.
  • Reconhecer o papel e contributo dos catadores de lixo comunitários para o sistema de desperdício zero.
  • Evitar, tanto quanto possível, a utilização de fibras sintéticas no vestuário e têxteis, bem como lutar contra o desperdício resultante da fast fashion
  • Evitar a exportação de resíduos, que perpetua o colonialismo, a injustiça e a iniquidade. 
  • Eliminar todas as formas de incineração de resíduos dos programas de gestão de resíduos.

Em suma, «desperdício zero» significa extrair da Natureza apenas aquilo de que precisamos, garantir que todas as comunidades prosperam e, ao mesmo tempo, respeitar os limites planetários permitindo à Natureza regenerar aquilo que dela retiramos e absorver o que lhe damos de volta.

As organizações que assinam esta declaração apelam aos Estados-Membros das Nações Unidas que se unam aos nossos esforços para criar iniciativas de desperdício zero em todo o mundo, iniciativas estas que têm de voltar a fazer justiça às comunidades que carregam às costas o fardo da poluição derivada da eliminação de resíduos, da extração de matérias-primas virgens e dos processos de produção industrial e, acima de tudo, voltar a fazer justiça à Natureza, sem a qual a humanidade não tem futuro.

Principais signatários

GAIA Global

GAIA Africa

GAIA Asia Pacific

GAIA Latin America and the Caribbean

GAIA US & Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Signatários:

Acción Ecologica, Mexico

AEEFG, Tunisia

Agrovivas, Ecuador

Agrupación deportiva y social nueva huiscapi, Chile

Alaska Community Action on Toxics, USA

Aliança Resíduo Zero Brasil, Brazil

Alianza Basura Cero, Chile

Alianza Basura Cero Ecuador, Ecuador

Alianza de Derecho Ambiental y Agua, Guatemala 

Alliance of Mission-Based Recyclers (AMBR), USA

Alto al ecocidio en el río Tula, México

AMAES Asociación Mujeres Ambientalista El Salvador, El Salvador

American Environmnetal Health Studies Project, USA

Anef Araucania, Chile

ANFUSEN, Chile

Antu kai Mawen, Chile

Aotearoa Plastic Pollution Alliance, New Zealand

Apoena Socioambiental, Brazil

Asociación CEIBA, Guatemala

Asociación de funcionarios/as del INDH, Chile

Asociación de Sindicalistas de Emcali “ASOSIEMCALI, Colombia

Asociación Ecológica Santo Tomás A.:C., México

asociación movimiento nacional de recicladores de chile ANARCH, Chile

Azul, USA

Bangon Kalikasan Ecology Centers, Philippines

Berkeley Ecology Center, USA

Bio Vision Africa (BiVA), Uganda

Bios Argentina Nodo Tandil, Argentina

Blue Dalian, China

Boomerang Alliance, Australia

Break Free From Plastic (BFFP), Global

Breathe Free Detroit, USA

BYO – US Reduces, USA

Cafeteria Culture, USA

Center for Public Health and Environmental Development (CEPHED), Nepal

Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology, Philippines

Centre for Earth works (CFEW), Nigeria

Centre for Financial Accountability, India

Cepa, Chile

CESTA AT El Salvador, El Salvador

CETAAR, Argentina

CHENAI PROJECTS GROUP, Zimbabwe

Circular Communities Cymru, United Kingdom

Circular Economy Portugal, Portugal

Clean Air Action Network of Glens Falls (NY), USA

Climate Crisis Policy, USA

Club Andino Chillán, Chile

Coletivo PanVerde, Brazil

Coletivo SOS Barueri, Brazil

Community Based Research Laboratory, Canada

Comunidad indígena tripaiñan, Chile

CONFETAM CUT, Brazil

Consumers’ Association of Penang, Malaysia

Coopcamate, Brazil

Cooperativa de Trabajo Asociado Planeta Verde, Colombia

Corporate Hippie Inc, USA

CSARO: Community Sanitation and Recycling Organization, Cambodia

Dr Lubna Sarwath, India

Društvo Ekologi brez meja, Slovenia

Echotopia LLC, USA

Eco Circular India Foundation, India

Ecology Center, USA

Ecosoum, Mongolia

ECOTON, Indonesia

End Plastic Pollution – Uganda, Uganda

Environment and Social Development Organization-ESDO, Bangladesh

Environmental Agency of Central Lombok, Indonesia

Fala Lamo Art, North Maluku, Indonesia

Frente Brasileira Alternativas à Incineração, Brazil

FreshWater Accountabiity Project, USA

Front Commun pour la Protection de l’Environnement et des Espaces Protégés, (FCPEEP-RDC), Democratic Republic of the Congo

fundación Aguaclara, Venezuela 

Fundación Apaztle, Mexico

Fundación Basura, Chile

Fundación El Árbol, Chile

Fundacion Lenga, Chile

Fundación Siendo, Argentina

Fundaron DRECCA, Colombia 

GAIA Africa, South Africa

GMTex – Indústria de Confecções Ltda, Brazil

GovAmb/IEE/USP, Brazil

Green Vientiane , Laos

Greenaction for Health and Environmental Justice, USA

Greeners Action, Hong Kong

Greenpeace, Global

Health Environment and Climate Action Foundation (HECAF 360), Nepal

HENDRA, Indonesia

Humusz Szövetség, Hungary

Indap, Chile

Innovation for life Group -INNOLIF GROUP, Tanzania

INSEA – Instituto Nenuca de Desenvolvimento Sustentável, Brazil

Institute for Local Self-Reliance, USA

Institution of Community Study and Empowerment/LP2M, Indonesia

Instituto ATEMIS – Análise do Trabalho e das Mutações Industriais e dos Serviços, Brazil

Instituto de Derecho Ambiental de Honduras (IDAMHO), Honduras

Instituto Pólis, Brazil

Jaringan Perempuan Pesisir Sulawesi Tenggara, Indonesia

Joint Action for Water, India

Kader Hijau Muhammadiyah, Indonesia

Karoi Zero Waste Consortium, Zimbabwe

Korea Zero Waste Movement Network, Republic of Korea

L’ets d’obit Congo, Congo

LA2PM HAN, Indonesia

Lekeh Development Foundation, Nigeria

Let’s Do It! Togo, Togo

Let´s Do It Foundation, Estonia

Loncoche Suma y Avanza, Chile

LP 21, Indonesia

Mi Jardinerita , Ecuador

Mother Earth Foundation, Philippines

Movieco, Brasil

Movimento Nacional dos Catadores de Materiais Recicláveis, Brasil

NEB | noesbasura.com, Mexico

NGO Zero Waste Montenegro, Montenegro

Nipe Fagio, Tanzania

No plastic in my sea, France

North Country Earth Action, USA

Nothing Left to Waste, USA

NoWaste Surabaya, Indonesia

Núcleo Alter-Nativas de Produção – UFMG, Brasil

NY Environmental Watch, USA

Observatório da Politica Nacional de Resíduos Sólidos, Brasil

Observatório da Reciclagem Inclusiva e Solidária, Brasil

Observatorio de Ecología Política de Venezuela, Venezuela 

Oceana, Brasil

Oceana Philippines International, Philippines

ONG Colectivo VientoSur, Chile

ONG Verde Urbano, Chile

Parisar, India

ParyavaranMitra, India

PCRZ, Spain

Plastic Change, Denmark

Plastic Free Future, USA

Plastic Pollution Coalition, USA

Plastic Soup Surfer, Netherlands

PlataformaCiutadana Residu Zero, Catalunya

PPLH Bali (Environmental Education Center), Indonesia

Preservar Ambiental, Brasil

Pro Public, Nepal

Projeto Hospitais Saudáveis, Brasil

RAPAL, América del Sur

RAPAL Uruguay, Uruguay

Red de Acción por los Derechos Ambientales RADA, Chile

Rede Lixo Zero Santa Tereza, Brasil

Regenerative Solutions, USA

Returning Organics to Soils, Australia

REWIND / River Warrior Indonesia, Indonesia

Rezero, Spain

River valley Organizing, USA

RM Engineering, USA

Rotary Club de Cotia Mulheres Empreendedoras, Brazil

Sahabat Alam Malaysia (Friends of the Earth), Malaysia

Save the Med Foundation, Spain

Sierra Club, Puerto Rico

SMAN 1Kuantan Mudik Provinsi Riau, Indonesia

Sociedade Ecológica Amigos Do Embu – SEAE, Brazil

Solidaridad Temuco, Chile

Sound Resource Management Group, Inc., USA

South African Waste Pickers Association, South Africa

Story of Stuff Project, USA

Surfrider Foundation Australia, Australia

Surfrider South Coast, Australia

Sustainable Environment Development Initiative, Nigeria

Swach Pune Seva Sahakari Sanstha Maryadit, India

Synergis – Zero Waste Group, USA

Taiwan Zero Waste Association, Taiwan

Taller de Comunicación Ambiental (Rosario), Argentina

Taller Ecologista, Argentina

Thanal, India

The Center for Applied Research and People’s Engagement, India

The Earth Bill Network, USA

The Good Tribe, Sweden

The Green Earth, Hong Kong

the Indonesia Plastic Bag Diet Movement, Indonesia

The Last Plastic Straw, Global

The Repurpose Project, USA

The Rubbish Trip, New Zealand

Tomate Rojo, Chile

ToxicsWatch, India

Toxisphera Associação de Saúde Ambiental, Brazil

Trash, Argentina

Trash Hero Thailand, Thailand

Trash Hero World, Global

Ultimate Support for Self Initiatives, Tanzania

UNICATA University for and with Waste Pickers, Brazil

United Kingdom Without Incineration Network (UKWIN), United Kingdom

UNTAG Semarang, Indonesia

Urban Ore, Inc., USA

Vietnam Zero Waste Alliance, Vietnam

VOICE of Irish Concern for the Environment, Ireland

WALHI North Sumatra, Indonesia

WALHI/Friends of the Earth Indonesia, Indonesia 

War on Waste Negros Oriental, Philippines

Waukesha County Environmental Action League, USA

Work on Waste, USA (AEHSP)

Yaksa Pelestari Bumi Berkelanjutan (YPBB), Indonesia

Yana Ferments, Ecuador

Yayasan Cipta Abdi Bangsa, Indonesia

YPBB, Indonesia

Zelena akcija / Friends of the Earth Croatia, Croatia

ZERO – Associação Sistema Terrestre Sustentável, Portugal

Zero Waste 4 Zero Burning, Canada

Zero Waste Association of South Africa (“ZWASA”)

Zero Waste Australia and the National Toxics Network Australia

Zero Waste BC, Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Zero Waste International Trust, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Ithaca, USA

Zero Waste Lviv, Ukraine

Zero Waste Montgomery County, USA

Zero Waste Network Aotearoa, New Zealand

Zero Waste North West, Ireland

Zero Waste Schools Wales CIC, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Society, Ukraine

Zero Waste USA

ZWIA, Global

Center for Biological Diversity, USA

Zero Waste Alliance Ukraine

Cooperativa maos dadas, Global

Fundación Alianza en el Desarrollo, Ecuador

Upstream, USA

LP 21, Indonesia


Kiswahili

TAMKO JUU YA SIKU YA KIMATAIFA YA TAKA SIFURI.

Tarehe: 30 Machi 2023

#TakaSifuri kwa mabadiliko ya dunia!

Shirika la Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives ambalo ni shirikisho la kimataifa dhidi ya shughuli za kuchoma takataka. Shirikisho hili linaundwa na makundi ya jamii ya ngazi za chini, mashirika ya kitaifa na kikanda yenye zaidi ya taasisi 1000 kutoka nchi 92 duniani. Tunashiriki kujenga jamii inayolinda maliasili na kupinga uharibifu. Kazi yetu imejikita kwenye kubadilisha mitazamo na matendo ya watu binafsi lakini pia matendo ya makundi jumuishi kwa kutoa elimu, kujengea jamii uwezo, utekelezaji wa mifumo ya Taka Sifuri na shughuli za uchechemuzi katika ngazi ya jamii, taifa na mataifa.

Tuna furaha sana juu ya uamuzi wa shirika la Umoja wa Mataifa (United Nations) kutambua na kuadhimisha siku ya #TakaSifuri duniani Tarehe 30 Machi 2023. Kutambua umuhimu wa mfumo wa #TakaSifuri kwenye jamii zetu kuna akisi miongo mingi ya harakati za kimazingira. Harakati hizi zilizoongozwa na mashirika mengi duniani yaliyofanya kazi bega kwa bega na watu kwenye jamii zinazoathirika zaidi na ukosefu wa usawa utokanao na uharibifu wa mazingira. Uharibifu huo tajwa ukitokana na mifumo ya uzalishaji na utumiaji maliasili kwa kiasi kilichopitiliza.

Kwenye siku kama hii tunataka tusisitize tena kuwa, #TakaSifuri ni uhifadhi wa maliasili kwa namna ya uwajibikaji kuanzia kwenye uzalishaji, ununuzi, uchakataji, matumizi na utunzwaji wa bidhaa pamoja na vifungashio na malighafi bila kuzichoma wala kuziachilia kwenye mifumo ya ardhi, maji au hewa huku tukihatarisha mazingira na afya za binadamu.

Kama mashirika yaliyo mstari wa mbele kutekeleza mfumo wa #TakaSifuri na kanuni zake tunapenda kutilia mkazo kuwa programu yoyote inayotumia neno ‘Taka Sifuri’ lazima itangulize juhudi za kupunguza na kuzuia taka kwa njia zifuatazo:

  • Kuwekeza kwenye sera zinazozuia utengenezaji na utupwaji wa taka.
  • Kupunguza bidhaa zinazoweza kutupwa kwa kuzitafutia mbadala wa bidhaa endelevu na zinazoweza kutumika tena na tena.
  • Kuunda mbinu za usambazaji wa bidhaa zisizotumia vifungashio vinavyoweza kutupwa. Hili linaweza kufanyika kwa kutumia vifungashio vilivyotengenezwa na malighafi salama zinazoweza kutumika tena. Suala hili linahusisha pia malighafi zinazoweza kurudishwa tena kwenye mizunguko ya kibaolojia kama ikifika mwisho wa matumizi ya bidhaa.
  • Kubadilisha mifumo ya uzalishaji kuwa na bidhaa endelevu, zinazohitajika, zinazotengenezeka na zinazoweza kuoza au salama kwa kuchakatwa.
  • Kusaidia kukuza maendeleo ya uchumi wa nchi kwa njia zinazopunguza umbali kati ya wanaozalisha na wanaonunua na kutoa kipaumbele kwenye matumizi ya vifungashio vinavyoweza kurejelezwa, kuosheka na kubeba bidhaa kwa makundi.
  • Kuwezesha upatikanaji wa chakula kwa watu kupitia kulima vyakula visivyo na sumu, vyenye afya na sio tu kwa ajili ya kutengeneza faida. Pia, kupunguza taka za vyakula na kusambaza tena vyakula vinavyobaki kama ziada kabla havijapoteza thamani ya lishe yake.
  • Mahali ambapo mabaki ya uchakataji yapo yadhibitiwe ndani ya nchi, na mahali ambapo makundi ya waokota taka yapo yajumuishwe kwenye mfumo mzima wa udhibiti taka.
  • Kutambua mchango na juhudu za waokota taka wa kwenye jamii na wale walioko kwenye mfumo wa #TakaSifuri.
  • Kuepuka kwa kadiri inavyowezekana matumizi ya nyuzi isiyo halisi kwenye kutengeneza nguo, na kukabiliana na mifumo mibaya ya uzalishwaji wa nguo nyingi na kwa haraka unaojulikana kama ‘fast fashion’.
  • Kuepuka bidhaa zinazotoka nchi za nje kwa mfumo wa ‘ukoloni taka’, yenye uonevu na ukosefu wa usawa.
  • Kuacha kabisa uchomaji wa taka wa namna yoyote ndani ya mifumo ya udhibiti taka.

Kwa ufupi, #TakaSifuri ina maana kuwa jamii inatakiwa kuchukua kutoka kwenye mazingira asilia vile tu inavyohitaji na kuhakikisha kwamba jamii zote zinaendelea kiuchumi huku zikiheshimu uwezo wa mazingira kuzalisha tena kile tunachokichukua na kupokea kile tunachokiachilia kwake.

Mashirika yanayosaini tamko hili yanatoa wito kwa wanachama wa nchi za Umoja wa Mataifa kuunga mkono juhudi za kujenga mifumo ya #TakaSifuri kwenye kila maeneo duniani. Juhudi hizi lazima zitekeleze usawa kwenye jamii zinazoathirika na uharibifu wa mazingira, utupwaji wa taka, uchimbaji wa malighafi na taratibu za uzalishaji kwenye viwanda. Awali ya yote, juhudi hizi zinatakiwa kurudisha usawa kwenye mazingira, maana bila kutunza mazingira hakuna kesho yetu.

Watia saini wakuu

GAIA Global

GAIA Africa

GAIA Asia Pacific

GAIA Latin America and the Caribbean

GAIA US & Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Watia saini:

Acción Ecologica, Mexico

AEEFG, Tunisia

Agrovivas, Ecuador

Agrupación deportiva y social nueva huiscapi, Chile

Alaska Community Action on Toxics, USA

Aliança Resíduo Zero Brasil, Brazil

Alianza Basura Cero, Chile

Alianza Basura Cero Ecuador, Ecuador

Alianza de Derecho Ambiental y Agua, Guatemala 

Alliance of Mission-Based Recyclers (AMBR), USA

Alto al ecocidio en el río Tula, México

AMAES Asociación Mujeres Ambientalista El Salvador, El Salvador

American Environmnetal Health Studies Project, USA

Anef Araucania, Chile

ANFUSEN, Chile

Antu kai Mawen, Chile

Aotearoa Plastic Pollution Alliance, New Zealand

Apoena Socioambiental, Brazil

Asociación CEIBA, Guatemala

Asociación de funcionarios/as del INDH, Chile

Asociación de Sindicalistas de Emcali “ASOSIEMCALI, Colombia

Asociación Ecológica Santo Tomás A.:C., México

asociación movimiento nacional de recicladores de chile ANARCH, Chile

Azul, USA

Bangon Kalikasan Ecology Centers, Philippines

Berkeley Ecology Center, USA

Bio Vision Africa (BiVA), Uganda

Bios Argentina Nodo Tandil, Argentina

Blue Dalian, China

Boomerang Alliance, Australia

Break Free From Plastic (BFFP), Global

Breathe Free Detroit, USA

BYO – US Reduces, USA

Cafeteria Culture, USA

Center for Public Health and Environmental Development (CEPHED), Nepal

Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology, Philippines

Centre for Earth works (CFEW), Nigeria

Centre for Financial Accountability, India

Cepa, Chile

CESTA AT El Salvador, El Salvador

CETAAR, Argentina

CHENAI PROJECTS GROUP, Zimbabwe

Circular Communities Cymru, United Kingdom

Circular Economy Portugal, Portugal

Clean Air Action Network of Glens Falls (NY), USA

Climate Crisis Policy, USA

Club Andino Chillán, Chile

Coletivo PanVerde, Brazil

Coletivo SOS Barueri, Brazil

Community Based Research Laboratory, Canada

Comunidad indígena tripaiñan, Chile

CONFETAM CUT, Brazil

Consumers’ Association of Penang, Malaysia

Coopcamate, Brazil

Cooperativa de Trabajo Asociado Planeta Verde, Colombia

Corporate Hippie Inc, USA

CSARO: Community Sanitation and Recycling Organization, Cambodia

Dr Lubna Sarwath, India

Društvo Ekologi brez meja, Slovenia

Echotopia LLC, USA

Eco Circular India Foundation, India

Ecology Center, USA

Ecosoum, Mongolia

ECOTON, Indonesia

End Plastic Pollution – Uganda, Uganda

Environment and Social Development Organization-ESDO, Bangladesh

Environmental Agency of Central Lombok, Indonesia

Fala Lamo Art, North Maluku, Indonesia

Frente Brasileira Alternativas à Incineração, Brazil

FreshWater Accountabiity Project, USA

Front Commun pour la Protection de l’Environnement et des Espaces Protégés, (FCPEEP-RDC), Democratic Republic of the Congo

fundación Aguaclara, Venezuela 

Fundación Apaztle, Mexico

Fundación Basura, Chile

Fundación El Árbol, Chile

Fundacion Lenga, Chile

Fundación Siendo, Argentina

Fundaron DRECCA, Colombia 

GAIA Africa, South Africa

GMTex – Indústria de Confecções Ltda, Brazil

GovAmb/IEE/USP, Brazil

Green Vientiane , Laos

Greenaction for Health and Environmental Justice, USA

Greeners Action, Hong Kong

Greenpeace, Global

Health Environment and Climate Action Foundation (HECAF 360), Nepal

HENDRA, Indonesia

Humusz Szövetség, Hungary

Indap, Chile

Innovation for life Group -INNOLIF GROUP, Tanzania

INSEA – Instituto Nenuca de Desenvolvimento Sustentável, Brazil

Institute for Local Self-Reliance, USA

Institution of Community Study and Empowerment/LP2M, Indonesia

Instituto ATEMIS – Análise do Trabalho e das Mutações Industriais e dos Serviços, Brazil

Instituto de Derecho Ambiental de Honduras (IDAMHO), Honduras

Instituto Pólis, Brazil

Jaringan Perempuan Pesisir Sulawesi Tenggara, Indonesia

Joint Action for Water, India

Kader Hijau Muhammadiyah, Indonesia

Karoi Zero Waste Consortium, Zimbabwe

Korea Zero Waste Movement Network, Republic of Korea

L’ets d’obit Congo, Congo

LA2PM HAN, Indonesia

Lekeh Development Foundation, Nigeria

Let’s Do It! Togo, Togo

Let´s Do It Foundation, Estonia

Loncoche Suma y Avanza, Chile

LP 21, Indonesia

Mi Jardinerita , Ecuador

Mother Earth Foundation, Philippines

Movieco, Brasil

Movimento Nacional dos Catadores de Materiais Recicláveis, Brasil

NEB | noesbasura.com, Mexico

NGO Zero Waste Montenegro, Montenegro

Nipe Fagio, Tanzania

No plastic in my sea, France

North Country Earth Action, USA

Nothing Left to Waste, USA

NoWaste Surabaya, Indonesia

Núcleo Alter-Nativas de Produção – UFMG, Brasil

NY Environmental Watch, USA

Observatório da Politica Nacional de Resíduos Sólidos, Brasil

Observatório da Reciclagem Inclusiva e Solidária, Brasil

Observatorio de Ecología Política de Venezuela, Venezuela 

Oceana, Brasil

Oceana Philippines International, Philippines

ONG Colectivo VientoSur, Chile

ONG Verde Urbano, Chile

Parisar, India

ParyavaranMitra, India

PCRZ, Spain

Plastic Change, Denmark

Plastic Free Future, USA

Plastic Pollution Coalition, USA

Plastic Soup Surfer, Netherlands

PlataformaCiutadana Residu Zero, Catalunya

PPLH Bali (Environmental Education Center), Indonesia

Preservar Ambiental, Brasil

Pro Public, Nepal

Projeto Hospitais Saudáveis, Brasil

RAPAL, América del Sur

RAPAL Uruguay, Uruguay

Red de Acción por los Derechos Ambientales RADA, Chile

Rede Lixo Zero Santa Tereza, Brasil

Regenerative Solutions, USA

Returning Organics to Soils, Australia

REWIND / River Warrior Indonesia, Indonesia

Rezero, Spain

River valley Organizing, USA

RM Engineering, USA

Rotary Club de Cotia Mulheres Empreendedoras, Brazil

Sahabat Alam Malaysia (Friends of the Earth), Malaysia

Save the Med Foundation, Spain

Sierra Club, Puerto Rico

SMAN 1Kuantan Mudik Provinsi Riau, Indonesia

Sociedade Ecológica Amigos Do Embu – SEAE, Brazil

Solidaridad Temuco, Chile

Sound Resource Management Group, Inc., USA

South African Waste Pickers Association, South Africa

Story of Stuff Project, USA

Surfrider Foundation Australia, Australia

Surfrider South Coast, Australia

Sustainable Environment Development Initiative, Nigeria

Swach Pune Seva Sahakari Sanstha Maryadit, India

Synergis – Zero Waste Group, USA

Taiwan Zero Waste Association, Taiwan

Taller de Comunicación Ambiental (Rosario), Argentina

Taller Ecologista, Argentina

Thanal, India

The Center for Applied Research and People’s Engagement, India

The Earth Bill Network, USA

The Good Tribe, Sweden

The Green Earth, Hong Kong

the Indonesia Plastic Bag Diet Movement, Indonesia

The Last Plastic Straw, Global

The Repurpose Project, USA

The Rubbish Trip, New Zealand

Tomate Rojo, Chile

ToxicsWatch, India

Toxisphera Associação de Saúde Ambiental, Brazil

Trash, Argentina

Trash Hero Thailand, Thailand

Trash Hero World, Global

Ultimate Support for Self Initiatives, Tanzania

UNICATA University for and with Waste Pickers, Brazil

United Kingdom Without Incineration Network (UKWIN), United Kingdom

UNTAG Semarang, Indonesia

Urban Ore, Inc., USA

Vietnam Zero Waste Alliance, Vietnam

VOICE of Irish Concern for the Environment, Ireland

WALHI North Sumatra, Indonesia

WALHI/Friends of the Earth Indonesia, Indonesia 

War on Waste Negros Oriental, Philippines

Waukesha County Environmental Action League, USA

Work on Waste, USA (AEHSP)

Yaksa Pelestari Bumi Berkelanjutan (YPBB), Indonesia

Yana Ferments, Ecuador

Yayasan Cipta Abdi Bangsa, Indonesia

YPBB, Indonesia

Zelena akcija / Friends of the Earth Croatia, Croatia

ZERO – Associação Sistema Terrestre Sustentável, Portugal

Zero Waste 4 Zero Burning, Canada

Zero Waste Association of South Africa (“ZWASA”)

Zero Waste Australia and the National Toxics Network Australia

Zero Waste BC, Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Zero Waste International Trust, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Ithaca, USA

Zero Waste Lviv, Ukraine

Zero Waste Montgomery County, USA

Zero Waste Network Aotearoa, New Zealand

Zero Waste North West, Ireland

Zero Waste Schools Wales CIC, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Society, Ukraine

Zero Waste USA

ZWIA, Global

Center for Biological Diversity, USA

Zero Waste Alliance Ukraine

Cooperativa maos dadas, Global

Fundación Alianza en el Desarrollo, Ecuador

Upstream, USA

LP 21, Indonesia


Bahasa Indonesia

DEKLARASI

HARI NOL SAMPAH INTERNASIONAL

30 Maret 2023

Nol sampah untuk mengubah dunia!

Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives, GAIA, adalah jaringan kelompok akar rumput dan aliansi nasional serta regional yang mewakili lebih dari 1000 organisasi dari 92 negara yang memiliki visi untuk membangun masa depan yang melindungi alam alih-alih merusaknya. Kami bekerja untuk mengubah praktik individu maupun kelompok melalui pendidikan, organisasi masyarakat, implementasi sistem nol sampah atau  zero waste, dan advokasi kebijakan publik pada tingkat lokal, nasional serta internasional.

Kami sangat gembira atas keputusan Perserikatan Bangsa-Bangsa (PBB) untuk menetapkan tanggal 30 Maret sebagai Hari Nol Sampah Internasional. Pengakuan terhadap pentingnya zero waste ini mencerminkan hasil kerja puluhan tahun aktivisme sosial-lingkungan, yang dipimpin oleh organisasi di seluruh dunia dan bekerja berdampingan dengan masyarakat yang paling terdampak oleh ketidakadilan lingkungan dan sosial yang disebabkan oleh sistem global produksi berlebihan serta konsumsi sumber daya alam yang berlebih.

Pada hari seperti hari ini, kami ingin menegaskan kembali bahwa zero waste adalah konservasi alam melalui produksi, konsumsi, penggunaan kembali, dan pemulihan produk, kemasan, dan material yang bertanggung jawab tanpa pembakaran dan tanpa pembuangan ke tanah, air, atau udara yang mengancam lingkungan atau kesehatan manusia. Sebagai organisasi yang berada di garis depan advokasi prinsip dan strategi zero waste, kami ingin menekankan bahwa setiap program yang menggunakan istilah “zero waste” harus mempertahankan fokus utama pada pengurangan dan pencegahan sampah, melalui tindakan-tindakan berikut:

  • Mengalokasikan sumber daya alam dan mengeluarkan kebijakan yang mencegah pembuangan dan timbulan sampah.
  • Meminimalkan produk sekali pakai dan mencari cara untuk menggantinya dengan alternatif lain yang lebih tahan lama dan dapat digunakan kembali.
  • Mengembangkan cara pendistribusianproduk tanpa menggunakan kemasan sekali pakai, menggunakan kemasan yang terbuat dari bahan yang mudah dan aman untuk digunakan kembali, atau jika hal tersebut tidak memungkinkan, maka harus melakukan daur ulang atau mengembalikan ke dalam siklus biologis setelah masa pakainya habis.
  • Mengubah sistem produksi untuk memproduksi barang yang diperlukan, tahan lama, dan dapat diperbaiki, atau setidaknya terbuat dari bahan yang mudah terurai atau dapat didaur ulang dengan aman.
  • Mendorong pengembangan ekonomi lokal yang mempersingkat jarak antara produsen dan konsumen, dengan mendukung penggunaan kemasan yang dapat digunakan kembali dan dicuci, serta penjualan produk secara curah.
  • Merebut kembali kedaulatan pangan rakyat – menanam pangan yang sehat dan bebas racun untuk dimakan dan bukan hanya untuk dijual, meminimalkan limbah pangan, dan membagikan makanan berlebih sebelum kehilangan kualitas nutrisinya.
  • Mengelola sampah daur ulang secara lokal, dan jika ada kelompok atau koperasi pekerja sampah, maka mereka harus dilibatkan dalam seluruh sistem pengelolaan sampah.
  • Mengakui peran penting dan kontribusi pekerja sampah dan pemulung di tingkat akar rumput dan dalam sistem zero waste.
  • Menghindari sebanyak mungkin penggunaan serat sintetis dalam pakaian dan tekstil, serta menentang pemborosan dari fast fashion.
  • Menghindari ekspor sampah yang mempertahankan praktik kolonialisme, ketidakadilan, dan ketidaksetaraan.
  • Menghilangkan pembakaran sampah – dalam bentuk apa pun – dari program pengelolaan sampah.

Singkatnya, sistem zero waste berarti hanya mengambil apa yang kita butuhkan dari alam, dan memastikan bahwa semua komunitas di masyarakat sejahtera, dengan tetap menghormati batasan alam dalam meregenerasi secara optimal dari apa yang telah kita ambil, dan menyerap apa yang kita lepaskan kembali ke alam.

Organisasi yang menandatangani deklarasi ini menyerukan kepada Negara Anggota PBB untuk bergabung dengan upaya kami dalam membangun inisiatif zero waste di seluruh penjuru dunia. Inisiatif-inisiatif ini harus mengembalikan keadilan kepada komunitas masyarakat yang harus menanggung beban polusi dari pembuangan sampah, ekstraksi bahan baku murni, dan proses manufaktur industri, dan terutama mengembalikan keadilan kepada alam karena tanpa hal tersebut tidak akan ada masa depan bagi umat manusia.

Penandatangan utama

GAIA Global

GAIA Africa

GAIA Asia Pacific

GAIA Latin America and the Caribbean

GAIA US & Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Penandatangan:

Acción Ecologica, Mexico

AEEFG, Tunisia

Agrovivas, Ecuador

Agrupación deportiva y social nueva huiscapi, Chile

Alaska Community Action on Toxics, USA

Aliança Resíduo Zero Brasil, Brazil

Alianza Basura Cero, Chile

Alianza Basura Cero Ecuador, Ecuador

Alianza de Derecho Ambiental y Agua, Guatemala 

Alliance of Mission-Based Recyclers (AMBR), USA

Alto al ecocidio en el río Tula, México

AMAES Asociación Mujeres Ambientalista El Salvador, El Salvador

American Environmnetal Health Studies Project, USA

Anef Araucania, Chile

ANFUSEN, Chile

Antu kai Mawen, Chile

Aotearoa Plastic Pollution Alliance, New Zealand

Apoena Socioambiental, Brazil

Asociación CEIBA, Guatemala

Asociación de funcionarios/as del INDH, Chile

Asociación de Sindicalistas de Emcali “ASOSIEMCALI, Colombia

Asociación Ecológica Santo Tomás A.:C., México

asociación movimiento nacional de recicladores de chile ANARCH, Chile

Azul, USA

Bangon Kalikasan Ecology Centers, Philippines

Berkeley Ecology Center, USA

Bio Vision Africa (BiVA), Uganda

Bios Argentina Nodo Tandil, Argentina

Blue Dalian, China

Boomerang Alliance, Australia

Break Free From Plastic (BFFP), Global

Breathe Free Detroit, USA

BYO – US Reduces, USA

Cafeteria Culture, USA

Center for Public Health and Environmental Development (CEPHED), Nepal

Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology, Philippines

Centre for Earth works (CFEW), Nigeria

Centre for Financial Accountability, India

Cepa, Chile

CESTA AT El Salvador, El Salvador

CETAAR, Argentina

CHENAI PROJECTS GROUP, Zimbabwe

Circular Communities Cymru, United Kingdom

Circular Economy Portugal, Portugal

Clean Air Action Network of Glens Falls (NY), USA

Climate Crisis Policy, USA

Club Andino Chillán, Chile

Coletivo PanVerde, Brazil

Coletivo SOS Barueri, Brazil

Community Based Research Laboratory, Canada

Comunidad indígena tripaiñan, Chile

CONFETAM CUT, Brazil

Consumers’ Association of Penang, Malaysia

Coopcamate, Brazil

Cooperativa de Trabajo Asociado Planeta Verde, Colombia

Corporate Hippie Inc, USA

CSARO: Community Sanitation and Recycling Organization, Cambodia

Dr Lubna Sarwath, India

Društvo Ekologi brez meja, Slovenia

Echotopia LLC, USA

Eco Circular India Foundation, India

Ecology Center, USA

Ecosoum, Mongolia

ECOTON, Indonesia

End Plastic Pollution – Uganda, Uganda

Environment and Social Development Organization-ESDO, Bangladesh

Environmental Agency of Central Lombok, Indonesia

Fala Lamo Art, North Maluku, Indonesia

Frente Brasileira Alternativas à Incineração, Brazil

FreshWater Accountabiity Project, USA

Front Commun pour la Protection de l’Environnement et des Espaces Protégés, (FCPEEP-RDC), Democratic Republic of the Congo

fundación Aguaclara, Venezuela 

Fundación Apaztle, Mexico

Fundación Basura, Chile

Fundación El Árbol, Chile

Fundacion Lenga, Chile

Fundación Siendo, Argentina

Fundaron DRECCA, Colombia 

GAIA Africa, South Africa

GMTex – Indústria de Confecções Ltda, Brazil

GovAmb/IEE/USP, Brazil

Green Vientiane , Laos

Greenaction for Health and Environmental Justice, USA

Greeners Action, Hong Kong

Greenpeace, Global

Health Environment and Climate Action Foundation (HECAF 360), Nepal

HENDRA, Indonesia

Humusz Szövetség, Hungary

Indap, Chile

Innovation for life Group -INNOLIF GROUP, Tanzania

INSEA – Instituto Nenuca de Desenvolvimento Sustentável, Brazil

Institute for Local Self-Reliance, USA

Institution of Community Study and Empowerment/LP2M, Indonesia

Instituto ATEMIS – Análise do Trabalho e das Mutações Industriais e dos Serviços, Brazil

Instituto de Derecho Ambiental de Honduras (IDAMHO), Honduras

Instituto Pólis, Brazil

Jaringan Perempuan Pesisir Sulawesi Tenggara, Indonesia

Joint Action for Water, India

Kader Hijau Muhammadiyah, Indonesia

Karoi Zero Waste Consortium, Zimbabwe

Korea Zero Waste Movement Network, Republic of Korea

L’ets d’obit Congo, Congo

LA2PM HAN, Indonesia

Lekeh Development Foundation, Nigeria

Let’s Do It! Togo, Togo

Let´s Do It Foundation, Estonia

Loncoche Suma y Avanza, Chile

LP 21, Indonesia

Mi Jardinerita , Ecuador

Mother Earth Foundation, Philippines

Movieco, Brasil

Movimento Nacional dos Catadores de Materiais Recicláveis, Brasil

NEB | noesbasura.com, Mexico

NGO Zero Waste Montenegro, Montenegro

Nipe Fagio, Tanzania

No plastic in my sea, France

North Country Earth Action, USA

Nothing Left to Waste, USA

NoWaste Surabaya, Indonesia

Núcleo Alter-Nativas de Produção – UFMG, Brasil

NY Environmental Watch, USA

Observatório da Politica Nacional de Resíduos Sólidos, Brasil

Observatório da Reciclagem Inclusiva e Solidária, Brasil

Observatorio de Ecología Política de Venezuela, Venezuela 

Oceana, Brasil

Oceana Philippines International, Philippines

ONG Colectivo VientoSur, Chile

ONG Verde Urbano, Chile

Parisar, India

ParyavaranMitra, India

PCRZ, Spain

Plastic Change, Denmark

Plastic Free Future, USA

Plastic Pollution Coalition, USA

Plastic Soup Surfer, Netherlands

PlataformaCiutadana Residu Zero, Catalunya

PPLH Bali (Environmental Education Center), Indonesia

Preservar Ambiental, Brasil

Pro Public, Nepal

Projeto Hospitais Saudáveis, Brasil

RAPAL, América del Sur

RAPAL Uruguay, Uruguay

Red de Acción por los Derechos Ambientales RADA, Chile

Rede Lixo Zero Santa Tereza, Brasil

Regenerative Solutions, USA

Returning Organics to Soils, Australia

REWIND / River Warrior Indonesia, Indonesia

Rezero, Spain

River valley Organizing, USA

RM Engineering, USA

Rotary Club de Cotia Mulheres Empreendedoras, Brazil

Sahabat Alam Malaysia (Friends of the Earth), Malaysia

Save the Med Foundation, Spain

Sierra Club, Puerto Rico

SMAN 1Kuantan Mudik Provinsi Riau, Indonesia

Sociedade Ecológica Amigos Do Embu – SEAE, Brazil

Solidaridad Temuco, Chile

Sound Resource Management Group, Inc., USA

South African Waste Pickers Association, South Africa

Story of Stuff Project, USA

Surfrider Foundation Australia, Australia

Surfrider South Coast, Australia

Sustainable Environment Development Initiative, Nigeria

Swach Pune Seva Sahakari Sanstha Maryadit, India

Synergis – Zero Waste Group, USA

Taiwan Zero Waste Association, Taiwan

Taller de Comunicación Ambiental (Rosario), Argentina

Taller Ecologista, Argentina

Thanal, India

The Center for Applied Research and People’s Engagement, India

The Earth Bill Network, USA

The Good Tribe, Sweden

The Green Earth, Hong Kong

the Indonesia Plastic Bag Diet Movement, Indonesia

The Last Plastic Straw, Global

The Repurpose Project, USA

The Rubbish Trip, New Zealand

Tomate Rojo, Chile

ToxicsWatch, India

Toxisphera Associação de Saúde Ambiental, Brazil

Trash, Argentina

Trash Hero Thailand, Thailand

Trash Hero World, Global

Ultimate Support for Self Initiatives, Tanzania

UNICATA University for and with Waste Pickers, Brazil

United Kingdom Without Incineration Network (UKWIN), United Kingdom

UNTAG Semarang, Indonesia

Urban Ore, Inc., USA

Vietnam Zero Waste Alliance, Vietnam

VOICE of Irish Concern for the Environment, Ireland

WALHI North Sumatra, Indonesia

WALHI/Friends of the Earth Indonesia, Indonesia 

War on Waste Negros Oriental, Philippines

Waukesha County Environmental Action League, USA

Work on Waste, USA (AEHSP)

Yaksa Pelestari Bumi Berkelanjutan (YPBB), Indonesia

Yana Ferments, Ecuador

Yayasan Cipta Abdi Bangsa, Indonesia

YPBB, Indonesia

Zelena akcija / Friends of the Earth Croatia, Croatia

ZERO – Associação Sistema Terrestre Sustentável, Portugal

Zero Waste 4 Zero Burning, Canada

Zero Waste Association of South Africa (“ZWASA”)

Zero Waste Australia and the National Toxics Network Australia

Zero Waste BC, Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Zero Waste International Trust, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Ithaca, USA

Zero Waste Lviv, Ukraine

Zero Waste Montgomery County, USA

Zero Waste Network Aotearoa, New Zealand

Zero Waste North West, Ireland

Zero Waste Schools Wales CIC, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Society, Ukraine

Zero Waste USA

ZWIA, Global

Center for Biological Diversity, USA

Zero Waste Alliance Ukraine

Cooperativa maos dadas, Global

Fundación Alianza en el Desarrollo, Ecuador

Upstream, USA

LP 21, Indonesia


français

DÉCLARATION

JOURNÉE INTERNATIONALE DU ZÉRO DÉCHET

 30 mars 2023

 Zéro déchet pour transformer le monde !

L’Alliance mondiale pour les alternatives aux incinérateurs, GAIA, est un réseau de groupes communautaires et d’alliances nationales et régionales représentant plus de 1000 organisations de 92 pays, bâtissant un avenir qui protège la nature au lieu de la transformer en déchets. Nous travaillons afin de changer les pratiques personnelles et collectives par l’éducation populaire, l’organisation communautaire, la mise en œuvre de systèmes zéro déchet et la défense de politiques publiques à l’échelle locale, nationale et internationale. 

Nous nous réjouissons que les Nations Unies aient décidé de proclamer le 30 mars comme la Journée internationale du zéro déchet. Cette reconnaissance de l’importance du zéro déchet est le résultat de décennies d’activisme socio-environnemental, dirigé par des organisations du monde entier travaillant aux côtés des communautés les plus touchées par les injustices environnementales et sociales causées par un système mondial de surproduction et de consommation de ressources naturelles.

En un jour comme celui-ci, nous voulons réaffirmer que le zéro déchet est la conservation de la nature par la production responsable, la consommation, la réutilisation et la récupération de produits, d’emballages et de matériaux sans avoir recours à l’incinération et sans rejets dans la terre, dans l’eau ou dans l’air qui menacent l’environnement ou la santé humaine. 

En tant qu’organisations à l’avant-garde des principes et des stratégies zéro déchet, nous tenons à souligner que tout programme utilisant le terme « zéro déchet » doit se concentrer d’abord et avant tout sur la réduction et la prévention des déchets grâce aux actions suivantes :

  • Investir des ressources et établir des politiques qui empêchent la production et l’élimination des déchets.
  • Réduire au minimum les produits jetables et trouver des façons de les remplacer par des solutions de rechange durables et réutilisables.
  • Développer des moyens de distribution de produits sans l’utilisation d’emballages jetables, en utilisant des emballages composés de matériaux faciles à réutiliser et sûrs, ou, à défaut, les recycler ou réinsérer en cycles biologiques à la fin d’une longue durée de vie.
  • Transformer le système de production afin de fabriquer des produits nécessaires, durables et réparables avant tout ou au moins en matériaux biodégradables ou recyclables en toute sécurité.
  • Promouvoir le développement des économies locales qui raccourcissent la distance entre ceux qui produisent et ceux qui consomment, en favorisant l’utilisation d’emballages réutilisables et lavables et la vente de produits en vrac.
  • Reconquérir la souveraineté alimentaire des peuples – des aliments sains et exempts de substances toxiques pour nourrir et non seulement pour en tirer profit, minimisant le gaspillage alimentaire et redistribuant les surplus alimentaires avant qu’ils ne perdent leurs qualités nutritionnelles.
  • Lorsque des déchets recyclables sont produits, les gérer localement, et lorsqu’il existe des groupes de ramasseurs de déchets ou des coopératives, les impliquer dans l’ensemble du système de gestion des déchets.
  • Reconnaître le rôle et la contribution des ramasseurs de déchets communautaires dans le système zéro déchet.
  • Éviter le plus possible l’utilisation de fibres synthétiques dans les vêtements et les textiles et faire face au gaspillage de la « mode rapide ».  
  • Éviter les exportations de déchets qui perpétuent le colonialisme, l’injustice et l’inégalité. 
  • Éliminer l’incinération des déchets – sous toutes ses formes – des programmes de gestion des déchets.

En résumé, le zéro déchet signifie extraire de la nature que ce dont nous avons besoin et veiller à l’épanouissement de toutes les communautés, tout en respectant les limites planétaires pour régénérer ce que nous prenons et absorber ce que nous redonnons à la nature.

Les organisations signataires de cette déclaration appellent les États membres des Nations Unies à joindre nos efforts pour construire des initiatives zéro déchet aux quatre coins de la planète. Ces initiatives doivent rendre justice aux communautés qui supportent la charge de la pollution due à l’élimination des déchets, à l’extraction de matières premières vierges et aux procédés de fabrication industrielle et surtout rendre justice à la nature, sans laquelle l’humanité n’a pas d’avenir.

Principaux signataires

GAIA Global

GAIA Africa

GAIA Asia Pacific

GAIA Latin America and the Caribbean

GAIA US & Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Signataires:

Acción Ecologica, Mexico

AEEFG, Tunisia

Agrovivas, Ecuador

Agrupación deportiva y social nueva huiscapi, Chile

Alaska Community Action on Toxics, USA

Aliança Resíduo Zero Brasil, Brazil

Alianza Basura Cero, Chile

Alianza Basura Cero Ecuador, Ecuador

Alianza de Derecho Ambiental y Agua, Guatemala 

Alliance of Mission-Based Recyclers (AMBR), USA

Alto al ecocidio en el río Tula, México

AMAES Asociación Mujeres Ambientalista El Salvador, El Salvador

American Environmnetal Health Studies Project, USA

Anef Araucania, Chile

ANFUSEN, Chile

Antu kai Mawen, Chile

Aotearoa Plastic Pollution Alliance, New Zealand

Apoena Socioambiental, Brazil

Asociación CEIBA, Guatemala

Asociación de funcionarios/as del INDH, Chile

Asociación de Sindicalistas de Emcali “ASOSIEMCALI, Colombia

Asociación Ecológica Santo Tomás A.:C., México

asociación movimiento nacional de recicladores de chile ANARCH, Chile

Azul, USA

Bangon Kalikasan Ecology Centers, Philippines

Berkeley Ecology Center, USA

Bio Vision Africa (BiVA), Uganda

Bios Argentina Nodo Tandil, Argentina

Blue Dalian, China

Boomerang Alliance, Australia

Break Free From Plastic (BFFP), Global

Breathe Free Detroit, USA

BYO – US Reduces, USA

Cafeteria Culture, USA

Center for Public Health and Environmental Development (CEPHED), Nepal

Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology, Philippines

Centre for Earth works (CFEW), Nigeria

Centre for Financial Accountability, India

Cepa, Chile

CESTA AT El Salvador, El Salvador

CETAAR, Argentina

CHENAI PROJECTS GROUP, Zimbabwe

Circular Communities Cymru, United Kingdom

Circular Economy Portugal, Portugal

Clean Air Action Network of Glens Falls (NY), USA

Climate Crisis Policy, USA

Club Andino Chillán, Chile

Coletivo PanVerde, Brazil

Coletivo SOS Barueri, Brazil

Community Based Research Laboratory, Canada

Comunidad indígena tripaiñan, Chile

CONFETAM CUT, Brazil

Consumers’ Association of Penang, Malaysia

Coopcamate, Brazil

Cooperativa de Trabajo Asociado Planeta Verde, Colombia

Corporate Hippie Inc, USA

CSARO: Community Sanitation and Recycling Organization, Cambodia

Dr Lubna Sarwath, India

Društvo Ekologi brez meja, Slovenia

Echotopia LLC, USA

Eco Circular India Foundation, India

Ecology Center, USA

Ecosoum, Mongolia

ECOTON, Indonesia

End Plastic Pollution – Uganda, Uganda

Environment and Social Development Organization-ESDO, Bangladesh

Environmental Agency of Central Lombok, Indonesia

Fala Lamo Art, North Maluku, Indonesia

Frente Brasileira Alternativas à Incineração, Brazil

FreshWater Accountabiity Project, USA

Front Commun pour la Protection de l’Environnement et des Espaces Protégés, (FCPEEP-RDC), Democratic Republic of the Congo

fundación Aguaclara, Venezuela 

Fundación Apaztle, Mexico

Fundación Basura, Chile

Fundación El Árbol, Chile

Fundacion Lenga, Chile

Fundación Siendo, Argentina

Fundaron DRECCA, Colombia 

GAIA Africa, South Africa

GMTex – Indústria de Confecções Ltda, Brazil

GovAmb/IEE/USP, Brazil

Green Vientiane , Laos

Greenaction for Health and Environmental Justice, USA

Greeners Action, Hong Kong

Greenpeace, Global

Health Environment and Climate Action Foundation (HECAF 360), Nepal

HENDRA, Indonesia

Humusz Szövetség, Hungary

Indap, Chile

Innovation for life Group -INNOLIF GROUP, Tanzania

INSEA – Instituto Nenuca de Desenvolvimento Sustentável, Brazil

Institute for Local Self-Reliance, USA

Institution of Community Study and Empowerment/LP2M, Indonesia

Instituto ATEMIS – Análise do Trabalho e das Mutações Industriais e dos Serviços, Brazil

Instituto de Derecho Ambiental de Honduras (IDAMHO), Honduras

Instituto Pólis, Brazil

Jaringan Perempuan Pesisir Sulawesi Tenggara, Indonesia

Joint Action for Water, India

Kader Hijau Muhammadiyah, Indonesia

Karoi Zero Waste Consortium, Zimbabwe

Korea Zero Waste Movement Network, Republic of Korea

L’ets d’obit Congo, Congo

LA2PM HAN, Indonesia

Lekeh Development Foundation, Nigeria

Let’s Do It! Togo, Togo

Let´s Do It Foundation, Estonia

Loncoche Suma y Avanza, Chile

LP 21, Indonesia

Mi Jardinerita , Ecuador

Mother Earth Foundation, Philippines

Movieco, Brasil

Movimento Nacional dos Catadores de Materiais Recicláveis, Brasil

NEB | noesbasura.com, Mexico

NGO Zero Waste Montenegro, Montenegro

Nipe Fagio, Tanzania

No plastic in my sea, France

North Country Earth Action, USA

Nothing Left to Waste, USA

NoWaste Surabaya, Indonesia

Núcleo Alter-Nativas de Produção – UFMG, Brasil

NY Environmental Watch, USA

Observatório da Politica Nacional de Resíduos Sólidos, Brasil

Observatório da Reciclagem Inclusiva e Solidária, Brasil

Observatorio de Ecología Política de Venezuela, Venezuela 

Oceana, Brasil

Oceana Philippines International, Philippines

ONG Colectivo VientoSur, Chile

ONG Verde Urbano, Chile

Parisar, India

ParyavaranMitra, India

PCRZ, Spain

Plastic Change, Denmark

Plastic Free Future, USA

Plastic Pollution Coalition, USA

Plastic Soup Surfer, Netherlands

PlataformaCiutadana Residu Zero, Catalunya

PPLH Bali (Environmental Education Center), Indonesia

Preservar Ambiental, Brasil

Pro Public, Nepal

Projeto Hospitais Saudáveis, Brasil

RAPAL, América del Sur

RAPAL Uruguay, Uruguay

Red de Acción por los Derechos Ambientales RADA, Chile

Rede Lixo Zero Santa Tereza, Brasil

Regenerative Solutions, USA

Returning Organics to Soils, Australia

REWIND / River Warrior Indonesia, Indonesia

Rezero, Spain

River valley Organizing, USA

RM Engineering, USA

Rotary Club de Cotia Mulheres Empreendedoras, Brazil

Sahabat Alam Malaysia (Friends of the Earth), Malaysia

Save the Med Foundation, Spain

Sierra Club, Puerto Rico

SMAN 1Kuantan Mudik Provinsi Riau, Indonesia

Sociedade Ecológica Amigos Do Embu – SEAE, Brazil

Solidaridad Temuco, Chile

Sound Resource Management Group, Inc., USA

South African Waste Pickers Association, South Africa

Story of Stuff Project, USA

Surfrider Foundation Australia, Australia

Surfrider South Coast, Australia

Sustainable Environment Development Initiative, Nigeria

Swach Pune Seva Sahakari Sanstha Maryadit, India

Synergis – Zero Waste Group, USA

Taiwan Zero Waste Association, Taiwan

Taller de Comunicación Ambiental (Rosario), Argentina

Taller Ecologista, Argentina

Thanal, India

The Center for Applied Research and People’s Engagement, India

The Earth Bill Network, USA

The Good Tribe, Sweden

The Green Earth, Hong Kong

the Indonesia Plastic Bag Diet Movement, Indonesia

The Last Plastic Straw, Global

The Repurpose Project, USA

The Rubbish Trip, New Zealand

Tomate Rojo, Chile

ToxicsWatch, India

Toxisphera Associação de Saúde Ambiental, Brazil

Trash, Argentina

Trash Hero Thailand, Thailand

Trash Hero World, Global

Ultimate Support for Self Initiatives, Tanzania

UNICATA University for and with Waste Pickers, Brazil

United Kingdom Without Incineration Network (UKWIN), United Kingdom

UNTAG Semarang, Indonesia

Urban Ore, Inc., USA

Vietnam Zero Waste Alliance, Vietnam

VOICE of Irish Concern for the Environment, Ireland

WALHI North Sumatra, Indonesia

WALHI/Friends of the Earth Indonesia, Indonesia 

War on Waste Negros Oriental, Philippines

Waukesha County Environmental Action League, USA

Work on Waste, USA (AEHSP)

Yaksa Pelestari Bumi Berkelanjutan (YPBB), Indonesia

Yana Ferments, Ecuador

Yayasan Cipta Abdi Bangsa, Indonesia

YPBB, Indonesia

Zelena akcija / Friends of the Earth Croatia, Croatia

ZERO – Associação Sistema Terrestre Sustentável, Portugal

Zero Waste 4 Zero Burning, Canada

Zero Waste Association of South Africa (“ZWASA”)

Zero Waste Australia and the National Toxics Network Australia

Zero Waste BC, Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Zero Waste International Trust, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Ithaca, USA

Zero Waste Lviv, Ukraine

Zero Waste Montgomery County, USA

Zero Waste Network Aotearoa, New Zealand

Zero Waste North West, Ireland

Zero Waste Schools Wales CIC, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Society, Ukraine

Zero Waste USA

ZWIA, Global

Center for Biological Diversity, USA

Zero Waste Alliance Ukraine

Cooperativa maos dadas, Global

Fundación Alianza en el Desarrollo, Ecuador

Upstream, USA

LP 21, Indonesia


italiano

DICHIARAZIONE

GIORNATA INTERNAZIONALE RIFIUTI ZERO

30 marzo 2023

Rifiuti zero per trasformare il mondo!

L’Alleanza Globale per l’Alternativa agli Inceneritori (GAIA – Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives) è una rete di gruppi locali e di alleanze nazionali e regionali che riunisce più di 1.000 organizzazioni di 92 paesi impegnate a costruire un futuro in cui si protegge la natura piuttosto che trasformarla in rifiuti. Lavoriamo per cambiare le abitudini individuali e collettive attraverso l’educazione civica (no popolare)  , l’organizzazione delle comunità, l’implementazione di sistemi a rifiuti zero e la promozione di politiche pubbliche a livello locale, nazionale e internazionale. 

Abbiamo appreso con molto soddisfazione la decisione delle Nazioni Unite di proclamare il 30 marzo Giornata Internazionale Rifiuti Zero. Questo riconoscimento dell’importanza di creare zero rifiuti riflette decenni di attivismo socio-ambientale promosso da organizzazioni di tutto il mondo che lavorano a fianco delle comunità più colpite dalle ingiustizie ambientali e sociali causate da un sistema globale di sovrapproduzione e consumo di risorse naturali.

In una giornata come questa vogliamo ribadire che l’azzeramento dei rifiuti è la conservazione della natura attraverso la produzione, il consumo, il riutilizzo e il recupero responsabili di prodotti, imballaggi e materiali senza incenerimento e senza scaricare nei terreni, nell’acqua o nell’aria quelle che sono delle minacce per l’ambiente o la salute umana. 

In qualità di organizzazioni all’avanguardia per quanto riguarda i principi e le strategie “Rifiuti Zero”, vogliamo sottolineare che qualsiasi programma che utilizzi il termine “Rifiuti Zero” deve concentrarsi innanzitutto sulla riduzione e sulla prevenzione dei rifiuti, attraverso le seguenti azioni:

  • Investire risorse e adottare politiche impegnate nella prevenzione della produzione e dello smaltimento dei rifiuti.
  • Ridurre al minimo i prodotti usa e getta e trovare il modo di sostituirli con alternative durevoli e riutilizzabili.
  • Sviluppare modalità di distribuzione dei prodotti senza l’uso di imballaggi monouso, utilizzando imballaggi realizzati con materiali facili e sicuri da riutilizzare o, in mancanza di questi, da riciclare o reinserire nei cicli biologici al termine di un lungo ciclo di vita.
  • Trasformare il sistema produttivo in modo da realizzare innanzitutto prodotti necessari, durevoli e riparabili, o quanto meno realizzati con materiali biodegradabili o riciclabili in modo sicuro.
  • Promuovere lo sviluppo di economie locali che riducono  la distanza tra chi produce e chi consuma, favorendo l’uso di imballaggi a rendere,  lavabili e la vendita di prodotti sfusi.
  • Permettere ai cittadini di recuperare la sovranità alimentare: coltivando cibo sano e privo di sostanze tossiche per nutrire e non solo  per trarre profitto, riducendo al minimo gli sprechi alimentari e ridistribuendo le eccedenze prima che perdano le loro qualità nutrizionali.
  • Laddove si generano scarti riciclabili, gestirli a livello locale e, se esistono gruppi o cooperative di gestione  di rifiuti, coinvolgerli nell’intero sistema di gestione dei rifiuti.
  • Riconoscere il ruolo e il contributo dei gestori e raccoglitori locali di rifiuti nel sistema Rifiuti Zero.
  • Evitare il più possibile l’uso di fibre sintetiche nell’abbigliamento e nel tessile e affrontare lo spreco del “fast fashion.” 
  • Evitare le esportazioni di rifiuti che perpetuano il colonialismo, l’ingiustizia e l’iniquità. 
  • Eliminare l’incenerimento dei rifiuti – in qualsiasi forma – dai programmi di gestione dei rifiuti.

 In sintesi, Rifiuti Zero significa estrarre dalla natura solo ciò di cui abbiamo bisogno e assicurare che tutte le comunità prosperino, rispettando i confini planetari per rigenerare ciò che prendiamo e permettendo il ripristino di     ciò che restituiamo alla natura.

Le organizzazioni che sottoscrivono questa dichiarazione chiedono agli Stati membri delle Nazioni Unite di unirsi ai nostri sforzi per costruire iniziative Rifiuti Zero in tutti gli angoli del pianeta. Queste iniziative devono riportare la giustizia nelle comunità che sopportano il peso dell’inquinamento dovuto allo smaltimento dei rifiuti, all’estrazione di materie prime vergini e ai processi di produzione industriale, e soprattutto ripristinare giustizia ed equilibrio nei confronti della natura, senza la quale non c’è futuro per l’umanità.

Principali firmatari:

GAIA Global

GAIA Africa

GAIA Asia Pacific

GAIA Latin America and the Caribbean

GAIA US & Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Principali:

Acción Ecologica, Mexico

AEEFG, Tunisia

Agrovivas, Ecuador

Agrupación deportiva y social nueva huiscapi, Chile

Alaska Community Action on Toxics, USA

Aliança Resíduo Zero Brasil, Brazil

Alianza Basura Cero, Chile

Alianza Basura Cero Ecuador, Ecuador

Alianza de Derecho Ambiental y Agua, Guatemala 

Alliance of Mission-Based Recyclers (AMBR), USA

Alto al ecocidio en el río Tula, México

AMAES Asociación Mujeres Ambientalista El Salvador, El Salvador

American Environmnetal Health Studies Project, USA

Anef Araucania, Chile

ANFUSEN, Chile

Antu kai Mawen, Chile

Aotearoa Plastic Pollution Alliance, New Zealand

Apoena Socioambiental, Brazil

Asociación CEIBA, Guatemala

Asociación de funcionarios/as del INDH, Chile

Asociación de Sindicalistas de Emcali “ASOSIEMCALI, Colombia

Asociación Ecológica Santo Tomás A.:C., México

asociación movimiento nacional de recicladores de chile ANARCH, Chile

Azul, USA

Bangon Kalikasan Ecology Centers, Philippines

Berkeley Ecology Center, USA

Bio Vision Africa (BiVA), Uganda

Bios Argentina Nodo Tandil, Argentina

Blue Dalian, China

Boomerang Alliance, Australia

Break Free From Plastic (BFFP), Global

Breathe Free Detroit, USA

BYO – US Reduces, USA

Cafeteria Culture, USA

Center for Public Health and Environmental Development (CEPHED), Nepal

Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology, Philippines

Centre for Earth works (CFEW), Nigeria

Centre for Financial Accountability, India

Cepa, Chile

CESTA AT El Salvador, El Salvador

CETAAR, Argentina

CHENAI PROJECTS GROUP, Zimbabwe

Circular Communities Cymru, United Kingdom

Circular Economy Portugal, Portugal

Clean Air Action Network of Glens Falls (NY), USA

Climate Crisis Policy, USA

Club Andino Chillán, Chile

Coletivo PanVerde, Brazil

Coletivo SOS Barueri, Brazil

Community Based Research Laboratory, Canada

Comunidad indígena tripaiñan, Chile

CONFETAM CUT, Brazil

Consumers’ Association of Penang, Malaysia

Coopcamate, Brazil

Cooperativa de Trabajo Asociado Planeta Verde, Colombia

Corporate Hippie Inc, USA

CSARO: Community Sanitation and Recycling Organization, Cambodia

Dr Lubna Sarwath, India

Društvo Ekologi brez meja, Slovenia

Echotopia LLC, USA

Eco Circular India Foundation, India

Ecology Center, USA

Ecosoum, Mongolia

ECOTON, Indonesia

End Plastic Pollution – Uganda, Uganda

Environment and Social Development Organization-ESDO, Bangladesh

Environmental Agency of Central Lombok, Indonesia

Fala Lamo Art, North Maluku, Indonesia

Frente Brasileira Alternativas à Incineração, Brazil

FreshWater Accountabiity Project, USA

Front Commun pour la Protection de l’Environnement et des Espaces Protégés, (FCPEEP-RDC), Democratic Republic of the Congo

fundación Aguaclara, Venezuela 

Fundación Apaztle, Mexico

Fundación Basura, Chile

Fundación El Árbol, Chile

Fundacion Lenga, Chile

Fundación Siendo, Argentina

Fundaron DRECCA, Colombia 

GAIA Africa, South Africa

GMTex – Indústria de Confecções Ltda, Brazil

GovAmb/IEE/USP, Brazil

Green Vientiane , Laos

Greenaction for Health and Environmental Justice, USA

Greeners Action, Hong Kong

Greenpeace, Global

Health Environment and Climate Action Foundation (HECAF 360), Nepal

HENDRA, Indonesia

Humusz Szövetség, Hungary

Indap, Chile

Innovation for life Group -INNOLIF GROUP, Tanzania

INSEA – Instituto Nenuca de Desenvolvimento Sustentável, Brazil

Institute for Local Self-Reliance, USA

Institution of Community Study and Empowerment/LP2M, Indonesia

Instituto ATEMIS – Análise do Trabalho e das Mutações Industriais e dos Serviços, Brazil

Instituto de Derecho Ambiental de Honduras (IDAMHO), Honduras

Instituto Pólis, Brazil

Jaringan Perempuan Pesisir Sulawesi Tenggara, Indonesia

Joint Action for Water, India

Kader Hijau Muhammadiyah, Indonesia

Karoi Zero Waste Consortium, Zimbabwe

Korea Zero Waste Movement Network, Republic of Korea

L’ets d’obit Congo, Congo

LA2PM HAN, Indonesia

Lekeh Development Foundation, Nigeria

Let’s Do It! Togo, Togo

Let´s Do It Foundation, Estonia

Loncoche Suma y Avanza, Chile

LP 21, Indonesia

Mi Jardinerita , Ecuador

Mother Earth Foundation, Philippines

Movieco, Brasil

Movimento Nacional dos Catadores de Materiais Recicláveis, Brasil

NEB | noesbasura.com, Mexico

NGO Zero Waste Montenegro, Montenegro

Nipe Fagio, Tanzania

No plastic in my sea, France

North Country Earth Action, USA

Nothing Left to Waste, USA

NoWaste Surabaya, Indonesia

Núcleo Alter-Nativas de Produção – UFMG, Brasil

NY Environmental Watch, USA

Observatório da Politica Nacional de Resíduos Sólidos, Brasil

Observatório da Reciclagem Inclusiva e Solidária, Brasil

Observatorio de Ecología Política de Venezuela, Venezuela 

Oceana, Brasil

Oceana Philippines International, Philippines

ONG Colectivo VientoSur, Chile

ONG Verde Urbano, Chile

Parisar, India

ParyavaranMitra, India

PCRZ, Spain

Plastic Change, Denmark

Plastic Free Future, USA

Plastic Pollution Coalition, USA

Plastic Soup Surfer, Netherlands

PlataformaCiutadana Residu Zero, Catalunya

PPLH Bali (Environmental Education Center), Indonesia

Preservar Ambiental, Brasil

Pro Public, Nepal

Projeto Hospitais Saudáveis, Brasil

RAPAL, América del Sur

RAPAL Uruguay, Uruguay

Red de Acción por los Derechos Ambientales RADA, Chile

Rede Lixo Zero Santa Tereza, Brasil

Regenerative Solutions, USA

Returning Organics to Soils, Australia

REWIND / River Warrior Indonesia, Indonesia

Rezero, Spain

River valley Organizing, USA

RM Engineering, USA

Rotary Club de Cotia Mulheres Empreendedoras, Brazil

Sahabat Alam Malaysia (Friends of the Earth), Malaysia

Save the Med Foundation, Spain

Sierra Club, Puerto Rico

SMAN 1Kuantan Mudik Provinsi Riau, Indonesia

Sociedade Ecológica Amigos Do Embu – SEAE, Brazil

Solidaridad Temuco, Chile

Sound Resource Management Group, Inc., USA

South African Waste Pickers Association, South Africa

Surfrider Foundation Australia, Australia

Surfrider South Coast, Australia

Sustainable Environment Development Initiative, Nigeria

Swach Pune Seva Sahakari Sanstha Maryadit, India

Synergis – Zero Waste Group, USA

Taiwan Zero Waste Association, Taiwan

Taller de Comunicación Ambiental (Rosario), Argentina

Taller Ecologista, Argentina

Thanal, India

The Center for Applied Research and People’s Engagement, India

The Earth Bill Network, USA

The Good Tribe, Sweden

The Green Earth, Hong Kong

the Indonesia Plastic Bag Diet Movement, Indonesia

The Last Plastic Straw, Global

The Repurpose Project, USA

The Rubbish Trip, New Zealand

Tomate Rojo, Chile

ToxicsWatch, India

Toxisphera Associação de Saúde Ambiental, Brazil

Trash, Argentina

Trash Hero Thailand, Thailand

Trash Hero World, Global

Ultimate Support for Self Initiatives, Tanzania

UNICATA University for and with Waste Pickers, Brazil

United Kingdom Without Incineration Network (UKWIN), United Kingdom

UNTAG Semarang, Indonesia

Urban Ore, Inc., USA

Vietnam Zero Waste Alliance, Vietnam

VOICE of Irish Concern for the Environment, Ireland

WALHI North Sumatra, Indonesia

WALHI/Friends of the Earth Indonesia, Indonesia 

War on Waste Negros Oriental, Philippines

Waukesha County Environmental Action League, USA

Work on Waste, USA (AEHSP)

Yaksa Pelestari Bumi Berkelanjutan (YPBB), Indonesia

Yana Ferments, Ecuador

Yayasan Cipta Abdi Bangsa, Indonesia

YPBB, Indonesia

Zelena akcija / Friends of the Earth Croatia, Croatia

ZERO – Associação Sistema Terrestre Sustentável, Portugal

Zero Waste 4 Zero Burning, Canada

Zero Waste Association of South Africa (“ZWASA”)

Zero Waste Australia and the National Toxics Network Australia

Zero Waste BC, Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Zero Waste International Trust, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Ithaca, USA

Zero Waste Lviv, Ukraine

Zero Waste Montgomery County, USA

Zero Waste Network Aotearoa, New Zealand

Zero Waste North West, Ireland

Zero Waste Schools Wales CIC, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Society, Ukraine

Zero Waste USA

ZWIA, Global

Center for Biological Diversity, USA

Zero Waste Alliance Ukraine

Cooperativa maos dadas, Global

Fundación Alianza en el Desarrollo, Ecuador

Upstream, USA

LP 21, Indonesia

Hungarian magyar nyelv

NYILATKOZAT

NEMZETKÖZI HULLADÉKMEGELŐZÉSI VILÁGNAP

2023. március 30.

Nulla hulladékkal egy jobb világért!

A Globális Szövetség a Hulladékégetés Alternatíváiért (Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives, GAIA) egy alulról szerveződő csoportokból, valamint országos és regionális szövetségekből álló hálózat, amely 92 ország több mint 1000 szervezetét képviseli, és olyan jövőt épít, ahol az erőforrások hulladékká alakítása helyett a  természet védelmére kerül a hangsúly. Az egyéni, valamint kollektív szokások és gyakorlatok megváltoztatásán dolgozunk a lakosság szemléletének formálásával, közösségek szervezésével, zero waste rendszerek bevezetésével, és a szakpolitikákat érintő érdekérvényesítés segítségével helyi, országos és nemzetközi szinten.

Örömünkre szolgál, hogy az Egyesült Nemzetek Szervezete úgy döntött, hogy március 30-át Nemzetközi Hulladékmegelőzési Világnappá nyilvánította. A hulladékmegelőzés fontosságának felismerésében visszaköszön a világ különböző pontjain működő szervezetek több évtizedes társadalmi-környezeti aktivizmusa. E szervezetek együtt dolgoznak azon közösségekkel, amelyeket leginkább érintenek a természeti erőforrások kizsigerelése és a globális túltermelés rendszere által okozott környezeti és társadalmi igazságtalanságok.

A mai napon is szeretnénk megerősíteni, hogy a nulla hulladékra való törekvés az összes erőforrás megőrzését jelenti a termékek, a csomagolóanyagok és anyagok felelős előállítása, fogyasztása, újrahasználata és hasznosítása révén anélkül, hogy elégetnénk azokat. Azt is jelenti továbbá, hogy nem történik olyan káros kibocsátás a földbe, a vízbe vagy a levegőbe,  amely veszélyeztetheti a környezetet vagy az emberi egészséget.

A hulladékmegelőzés elveit és stratégiáit a frontvonalban képviselő szervezetekként szeretnénk hangsúlyozni, hogy minden olyan programnak, amely a „zero waste” kifejezést használja, mindenekelőtt a hulladék csökkentésére és megelőzésére kell összpontosítania, a következő pontok tettekre váltásával:

  • Fektessük be a szükséges erőforrásokat, és dolgozzunk ki olyan szabályozást, amely megakadályozza a hulladék keletkezését és ártalmatlanítását.
  • Csökkentsük minimálisra az egyszer használatos termékeket, és keressük meg a módját, hogy lecseréljük őket tartós vagy újrahasználható alternatívákra.
  • Oldjuk meg a termékek kiszállítását eldobható csomagolás használata nélkül; olyan anyagokból készült csomagolás használatával, amely könnyen és biztonságosan újrahasználható, vagy ennek hiányában újrahasznosítható vagy visszahelyezhető a biológiai körforgásba a hosszú élettartama végén.
  • A termelési rendszereket úgy alakítsuk át, hogy  mindenekelőtt szükséges, tartós és javítható termékeket állítsunk elő, vagy azok legalábbis biológiailag lebomló vagy biztonságosan újrahasznosítható anyagokból készüljenek.
  • Fejlesszük a helyi gazdaságokat, amelyek csökkentik a távolságot a termelők és a fogyasztók között, előnyben részesítve a visszaváltható és mosható csomagolások használatát, valamint a termékek ömlesztett értékesítését.
  • Szerezzük vissza az emberek méltóságát az élelmezés terén – a mérgező anyagoktól mentes, egészséges élelmiszerek előállításával, amelyek értékes táplálékként szolgálnak, és nem csak az anyagi haszonszerzés eszközei. Szorítsuk vissza az élelmiszerpazarlást, és gondoskodjunk a felesleges élelmiszerek újraelosztásáról, mielőtt azok elveszítik minőségüket.
  • Helyben kezeljük az újrahasznosítható selejt termékeket, és ahol vannak hulladékkezelő szövetkezetek, vonjuk be őket a teljes hulladékgazdálkodási rendszerbe.
  • Ismerjük fel a helyi hulladékkal foglalkozó munkások és hulladékgyűjtögeők szerepét és hozzájárulását a zero waste rendszerben.
  • Amennyire csak lehetséges, kerüljük el a szintetikus anyagok használatát a ruhákban és a textíliákban, és küzdjünk a „fast fashion” pazarlása ellen.
  • Kerüljük el a hulladékexportot, amely állandósítja a gyarmatosítást, az igazságtalanságot és az egyenlőtlenséget.
  • Szüntessük meg a hulladékégetés minden formáját a hulladékgazdálkodási programokban.

Összefoglalva tehát a zero waste kifejezés azt jelenti, hogy csak azt vonjuk ki a természetből, amire szükségünk van, és biztosítjuk, hogy minden közösség virágozzon, miközben tiszteletben tartjuk a bolygónk határait, hogy újratermelődhessen az, amit elveszünk, és kellőképpen ártalmatlanítsuk azt, amit visszahelyezünk a természetbe.

A nyilatkozatot aláíró szervezetek felszólítják az Egyesült Nemzetek Szervezetének tagállamait, hogy csatlakozzanak erőfeszítéseinkhez a nulla hulladékkal kapcsolatos kezdeményezések kiépítése érdekében a világ minden sarkában. A kezdeményezések célja helyreállítani az igazságosságot a hulladék ártalmatlanításából, a szűz nyersanyagok kitermeléséből és az ipari gyártási folyamatokból származó szennyezés terhét viselő közösségeknél, és mindenekelőtt helyreállítani az igazságosságot a természetben, amely nélkül nincs jövője az emberiségnek.

Vezeto aláírók:

GAIA Global

GAIA Africa

GAIA Asia Pacific

GAIA Latin America and the Caribbean

GAIA US & Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Aláírók:

Acción Ecologica, Mexico

AEEFG, Tunisia

Agrovivas, Ecuador

Agrupación deportiva y social nueva huiscapi, Chile

Alaska Community Action on Toxics, USA

Aliança Resíduo Zero Brasil, Brazil

Alianza Basura Cero, Chile

Alianza Basura Cero Ecuador, Ecuador

Alianza de Derecho Ambiental y Agua, Guatemala 

Alliance of Mission-Based Recyclers (AMBR), USA

Alto al ecocidio en el río Tula, México

AMAES Asociación Mujeres Ambientalista El Salvador, El Salvador

American Environmnetal Health Studies Project, USA

Anef Araucania, Chile

ANFUSEN, Chile

Antu kai Mawen, Chile

Aotearoa Plastic Pollution Alliance, New Zealand

Apoena Socioambiental, Brazil

Asociación CEIBA, Guatemala

Asociación de funcionarios/as del INDH, Chile

Asociación de Sindicalistas de Emcali “ASOSIEMCALI, Colombia

Asociación Ecológica Santo Tomás A.:C., México

asociación movimiento nacional de recicladores de chile ANARCH, Chile

Azul, USA

Bangon Kalikasan Ecology Centers, Philippines

Berkeley Ecology Center, USA

Bio Vision Africa (BiVA), Uganda

Bios Argentina Nodo Tandil, Argentina

Blue Dalian, China

Boomerang Alliance, Australia

Break Free From Plastic (BFFP), Global

Breathe Free Detroit, USA

BYO – US Reduces, USA

Cafeteria Culture, USA

Center for Public Health and Environmental Development (CEPHED), Nepal

Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology, Philippines

Centre for Earth works (CFEW), Nigeria

Centre for Financial Accountability, India

Cepa, Chile

CESTA AT El Salvador, El Salvador

CETAAR, Argentina

CHENAI PROJECTS GROUP, Zimbabwe

Circular Communities Cymru, United Kingdom

Circular Economy Portugal, Portugal

Clean Air Action Network of Glens Falls (NY), USA

Climate Crisis Policy, USA

Club Andino Chillán, Chile

Coletivo PanVerde, Brazil

Coletivo SOS Barueri, Brazil

Community Based Research Laboratory, Canada

Comunidad indígena tripaiñan, Chile

CONFETAM CUT, Brazil

Consumers’ Association of Penang, Malaysia

Coopcamate, Brazil

Cooperativa de Trabajo Asociado Planeta Verde, Colombia

Corporate Hippie Inc, USA

CSARO: Community Sanitation and Recycling Organization, Cambodia

Dr Lubna Sarwath, India

Društvo Ekologi brez meja, Slovenia

Echotopia LLC, USA

Eco Circular India Foundation, India

Ecology Center, USA

Ecosoum, Mongolia

ECOTON, Indonesia

End Plastic Pollution – Uganda, Uganda

Environment and Social Development Organization-ESDO, Bangladesh

Environmental Agency of Central Lombok, Indonesia

Fala Lamo Art, North Maluku, Indonesia

Frente Brasileira Alternativas à Incineração, Brazil

FreshWater Accountabiity Project, USA

Front Commun pour la Protection de l’Environnement et des Espaces Protégés, (FCPEEP-RDC), Democratic Republic of the Congo

fundación Aguaclara, Venezuela 

Fundación Apaztle, Mexico

Fundación Basura, Chile

Fundación El Árbol, Chile

Fundacion Lenga, Chile

Fundación Siendo, Argentina

Fundaron DRECCA, Colombia 

GAIA Africa, South Africa

GMTex – Indústria de Confecções Ltda, Brazil

GovAmb/IEE/USP, Brazil

Green Vientiane , Laos

Greenaction for Health and Environmental Justice, USA

Greeners Action, Hong Kong

Greenpeace, Global

Health Environment and Climate Action Foundation (HECAF 360), Nepal

HENDRA, Indonesia

Humusz Szövetség, Hungary

Indap, Chile

Innovation for life Group -INNOLIF GROUP, Tanzania

INSEA – Instituto Nenuca de Desenvolvimento Sustentável, Brazil

Institute for Local Self-Reliance, USA

Institution of Community Study and Empowerment/LP2M, Indonesia

Instituto ATEMIS – Análise do Trabalho e das Mutações Industriais e dos Serviços, Brazil

Instituto de Derecho Ambiental de Honduras (IDAMHO), Honduras

Instituto Pólis, Brazil

Jaringan Perempuan Pesisir Sulawesi Tenggara, Indonesia

Joint Action for Water, India

Kader Hijau Muhammadiyah, Indonesia

Karoi Zero Waste Consortium, Zimbabwe

Korea Zero Waste Movement Network, Republic of Korea

L’ets d’obit Congo, Congo

LA2PM HAN, Indonesia

Lekeh Development Foundation, Nigeria

Let’s Do It! Togo, Togo

Let´s Do It Foundation, Estonia

Loncoche Suma y Avanza, Chile

LP 21, Indonesia

Mi Jardinerita , Ecuador

Mother Earth Foundation, Philippines

Movieco, Brasil

Movimento Nacional dos Catadores de Materiais Recicláveis, Brasil

NEB | noesbasura.com, Mexico

NGO Zero Waste Montenegro, Montenegro

Nipe Fagio, Tanzania

No plastic in my sea, France

North Country Earth Action, USA

Nothing Left to Waste, USA

NoWaste Surabaya, Indonesia

Núcleo Alter-Nativas de Produção – UFMG, Brasil

NY Environmental Watch, USA

Observatório da Politica Nacional de Resíduos Sólidos, Brasil

Observatório da Reciclagem Inclusiva e Solidária, Brasil

Observatorio de Ecología Política de Venezuela, Venezuela 

Oceana, Brasil

Oceana Philippines International, Philippines

ONG Colectivo VientoSur, Chile

ONG Verde Urbano, Chile

Parisar, India

ParyavaranMitra, India

PCRZ, Spain

Plastic Change, Denmark

Plastic Free Future, USA

Plastic Pollution Coalition, USA

Plastic Soup Surfer, Netherlands

PlataformaCiutadana Residu Zero, Catalunya

PPLH Bali (Environmental Education Center), Indonesia

Preservar Ambiental, Brasil

Pro Public, Nepal

Projeto Hospitais Saudáveis, Brasil

RAPAL, América del Sur

RAPAL Uruguay, Uruguay

Red de Acción por los Derechos Ambientales RADA, Chile

Rede Lixo Zero Santa Tereza, Brasil

Regenerative Solutions, USA

Returning Organics to Soils, Australia

REWIND / River Warrior Indonesia, Indonesia

Rezero, Spain

River valley Organizing, USA

RM Engineering, USA

Rotary Club de Cotia Mulheres Empreendedoras, Brazil

Sahabat Alam Malaysia (Friends of the Earth), Malaysia

Save the Med Foundation, Spain

Sierra Club, Puerto Rico

SMAN 1Kuantan Mudik Provinsi Riau, Indonesia

Sociedade Ecológica Amigos Do Embu – SEAE, Brazil

Solidaridad Temuco, Chile

Sound Resource Management Group, Inc., USA

South African Waste Pickers Association, South Africa

Surfrider Foundation Australia, Australia

Surfrider South Coast, Australia

Sustainable Environment Development Initiative, Nigeria

Swach Pune Seva Sahakari Sanstha Maryadit, India

Synergis – Zero Waste Group, USA

Taiwan Zero Waste Association, Taiwan

Taller de Comunicación Ambiental (Rosario), Argentina

Taller Ecologista, Argentina

Thanal, India

The Center for Applied Research and People’s Engagement, India

The Earth Bill Network, USA

The Good Tribe, Sweden

The Green Earth, Hong Kong

the Indonesia Plastic Bag Diet Movement, Indonesia

The Last Plastic Straw, Global

The Repurpose Project, USA

The Rubbish Trip, New Zealand

Tomate Rojo, Chile

ToxicsWatch, India

Toxisphera Associação de Saúde Ambiental, Brazil

Trash, Argentina

Trash Hero Thailand, Thailand

Trash Hero World, Global

Ultimate Support for Self Initiatives, Tanzania

UNICATA University for and with Waste Pickers, Brazil

United Kingdom Without Incineration Network (UKWIN), United Kingdom

UNTAG Semarang, Indonesia

Urban Ore, Inc., USA

Vietnam Zero Waste Alliance, Vietnam

VOICE of Irish Concern for the Environment, Ireland

WALHI North Sumatra, Indonesia

WALHI/Friends of the Earth Indonesia, Indonesia 

War on Waste Negros Oriental, Philippines

Waukesha County Environmental Action League, USA

Work on Waste, USA (AEHSP)

Yaksa Pelestari Bumi Berkelanjutan (YPBB), Indonesia

Yana Ferments, Ecuador

Yayasan Cipta Abdi Bangsa, Indonesia

YPBB, Indonesia

Zelena akcija / Friends of the Earth Croatia, Croatia

ZERO – Associação Sistema Terrestre Sustentável, Portugal

Zero Waste 4 Zero Burning, Canada

Zero Waste Association of South Africa (“ZWASA”)

Zero Waste Australia and the National Toxics Network Australia

Zero Waste BC, Canada

Zero Waste Europe

Zero Waste International Trust, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Ithaca, USA

Zero Waste Lviv, Ukraine

Zero Waste Montgomery County, USA

Zero Waste Network Aotearoa, New Zealand

Zero Waste North West, Ireland

Zero Waste Schools Wales CIC, United Kingdom

Zero Waste Society, Ukraine

Zero Waste USA

ZWIA, Global

Center for Biological Diversity, USA

Zero Waste Alliance Ukraine

Cooperativa maos dadas, Global

Fundación Alianza en el Desarrollo, Ecuador

Upstream, USA

LP 21, Indonesia

On January 9, 2023, the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) Asia Pacific together with Ecowaste Coalition and the Interfacing Development Interventions for Sustainability (IDIS) – Davao and in partnership with Ecoteneo, Masipag Mindanao, Panalipdan Youth-Davao, and Saligan-Mindanaw stood together with affected farmers, residents, and concerned members of the community as they opposed the pending construction of a waste-to-energy (WtE) incinerator in Davao City.

In August last year, the City Council of Davao unanimously approved a WtE facility funded by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) despite a national ban on incineration as provided for by the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act and the Clean Air Act. Proposed to be constructed on ten hectares in Barangay Biao Escuela in Tugbok District, the facility will stand close to the barangay’s school, agricultural lands, and a few hundred meters away from the relocation site of the affected communities.

During a people’s forum held in January 9, the organizations have spoken out against the city government’s plan for a WtE incinerator, stating that the facility will only impact people’s health and Davao’s rich biodiversity, particularly its already fragile watersheds. 

According to Gary Villocino of Masipag, a network of farmers in Davao, “The construction of this facility will not only be dangerous to people’s health but will also destroy valuable agricultural land. Land that could be used to cultivate resources for the community.”

Mark Peñalver of IDIS-Davao adds, “When it comes to WtE incineration, the bottom line is this: not only is it a dangerous way to produce energy, it’s also incredibly harmful to the environment.  What’s more, incineration is not a renewable or sustainable energy source. In fact, it actually produces more greenhouse gasses than coal. So not only is incineration a bad choice for the environment, but it’s also not a wise choice from a climate perspective.”  

Randy Catubag Irog of the Mintal Resource Collectors Association (MiRCA) in Barangay Mintal, despite fearing repercussions for disagreeing with the project, stated his disapproval and highlighted that there are more sustainable approaches that are helpful to the community and the environment. “We collect recyclables and sell them for profit and WtE will only teach future generations to be lazy as it undermines recycling efforts if waste can be simply burned away.”    

Communities cited that the City’s waste composition is 50 percent organic waste which cannot be burned in the proposed type of WtE technology. Advocates point out that the WtE project is also not a financially viable project for JICA, the city government and the private sector. 

Peter Damary of the start-up enterprise, Limadol, shared that Davao needs to focus on segregation at source.  “Davao’s case, around 50  percent of waste is composed of food waste. If removed from the waste stream through composting, it eases the burden on landfills and leaves other waste available for recycling. Further, the environmental value composting  contributes to methane reduction can not be ignored.”

Citing the efforts of other barangays in the country, GAIA Asia Pacific’s Zero Waste Coordinator in the Philippines, Archie Abellar shares that individuals and communities in Davao are similarly gradually adapting Zero Waste strategies to combat waste. From composting to opting for refills instead of single-use plastics or sachets, there is a conscious effort from the grassroots to veer away from practices that harm the planet.

He concludes, “WtE incineration is a band-aid solution and will only make matters worse in the long run. JICA has not examined existing options on waste management in the City and have promoted an expensive and harmful technology. We call on JICA and the local government to support zero waste systems as they offer  inclusive, effective and sustainable approach to the City’s waste problem .”

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The International Zero Waste Month is made possible in partnership with the following media outlets: Advocates (Philippines), Bandung Bergerak (Indonesia), Business Ecology (China), The Business Post (Bangladesh), The Manila Times (Philippines), Pressenza (Global), Rappler (Philippines), Sunrise Today (Pakistan), The Recombobulator Lab (Global), and Republic Asia. 

Zero Waste Month celebrations originated in the Philippines in 2012 when youth leaders issued a Zero Waste Youth Manifesto calling for, among other things, the celebration of a Zero Waste Month. This was made official when Presidential Proclamation No. 760 was issued, declaring January as Zero Waste Month in the Philippines. It was then promoted widely by NGOs and communities that had already adopted this approach to manage their waste.

 ***

GAIA is a network of grassroots groups as well as national and regional alliances representing more than 1000 organizations from 92 countries.

For more information, visit www.no-burn.org or follow GAIA Asia Pacific on social media: Facebook,  Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and TikTok.

CONTACT

Dan Abril I Communications Associate I Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) – Pacific I dan@no-burn.org I +63917 419 4426

Archie Abellar I Zero Waste Philippine Coordinator I Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) – Pacific I archie@no-burn.org I +63908 770 0681

By Camila Aguilera, communications GAIA LAC; Alejandra Parra, Plastics and Zero Waste GAIA LAC.

GAIA members and allies at INC1 in Uruguay

In March of this year, we celebrated the culmination of the fifth meeting of the United Nations with the decision to develop  the future Global Plastics Treaty, a global tool focused on regulating plastic production and ending plastic contamination, and that recognized the role of grassroots recyclers for the first time. 

Nevertheless, we celebrate with caution, because as long as there is no definitive end to the plastic pollution crisis and the negotiations are not settled, we will continue to move between hope and mobilization.

The first meeting of the Intergovernmental Negotiations Committee (INC-1), the organization in charge of developing the future treaty, began on November 28 in Punta del Este, Uruguay. Meanwhile, plastic production and pollution continue without respite, because while we celebrate the steps taken to close the tap of plastic pollution, the production industry, waste exports to the Global South and the threats of false solutions are also advancing, and are kicking their way through.

For example, between the resolution of UNEA 5.2 and the first meeting of the International Negotiation Committee (INC-1), Mexico’s Supreme Court of Justice granted an injunction to the companies Oxxo and Propimex, both owned by Femsa Coca-Cola, exempting them from having to comply with the prohibition to continue selling their products in single-use plastic containers such as PET and styrofoam.

Likewise, areas in the Asia Pacific continue to suffer the severe consequences of pollution caused by plastic waste imports that are not adequately regulated and controlled. A legally binding Global Plastics Treaty would complement the Basel Convention’s measures by providing more tools to end the cross border trade in plastic waste, to promote local solutions that do not lead to false solutions such as incineration, and to eliminate plastics that cannot be safely reused or recycled.

It is critical that each INC meeting reaches agreements that reflect the spirit and ambitions set out in Resolution 5/14: “Ending Plastic Pollution: Towards a Legally Binding International Instrument”. Our members and hundreds of civil society organizations are now ready to join forces and demand that governments adhere to the high-ambition commission, taking robust measures to address every stage of the plastic cycle, from the extraction of raw material, through manufacturing, use, to final disposal and management.

Therefore, the success of the first meeting of the INC will depend on:

  • Delivering a negotiations roadmap that prioritizes reducing plastic polymer production and a just transition.  Time-allocation is decisive, and only a negotiation schedule that makes ample time for reduction and just transition will deliver a treaty that is effective on those fronts.
  • Deciding on a Specific Convention that blends binding global obligations including reduction targets with National Action Plans that build the infrastructure and systems needed to reduce plastic production, end plastic pollution, and deliver a just transition for affected informal and formal workers, including reuse, and infrastructure to safely mechanically recycle plastic waste in the countries where it is generated .
  • Adopting working definitions for concepts that shape treaty scope, such as “plastics”, “plastic pollution” and “lifecycle”, to ensure clarity in negotiations and sufficient scope to effectively tackle pollution across the lifecycle of plastics, until such definitions are formally adopted in future treaty text or annexes.
  • Establishing a framework to ban plastic polymers, additives, products and waste-management processes that harm human or environmental health.
  • Ensuring meaningful and direct participation for civil society, not mediated by the Major Groups system that is not fit for purpose for treaty negotiations and was not adopted for the Open-Ended Working Group meeting. Civil society needs include financial and interpretation support for participation in negotiations, as well as access to contact groups. Special attention must be given to waste-pickers, fenceline and frontline communities, Indigenous and Traditional communities, and women.

It is the beginning of a two and a half year journey to finally achieve a Global Plastics Treaty designed at the height of the world crisis of plastics pollution; one that is legally binding, with measures that cover the complete lifecycle of plastics, that prohibit the use of toxic additives and that provide a just transition for recyclers. The organizations of our movement are ready to make their voices heard.